Oct 06, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Regulations



Each student and faculty member at Lenoir-Rhyne University is expected to exhibit conduct within the dictates of a Christian conscience and do what is right as a matter of choice rather than as a matter of compulsion.

Lenoir-Rhyne University, like every academic institution, has certain standards and policies adopted as guides for the conduct of general activities for both students and faculty members. These standards are outlined in the student and faculty handbooks. The University reserves the right to request the withdrawal of any student who fails in conduct or attitude to meet the regulations and policies adopted by the University.

It is the responsibility of each student to learn and follow the standards, policies, and regulations stated in the university catalog and student handbook. Students are responsible for fulfilling the requirements as outlined in the catalog in effect at the time of their first matriculation, unless their academic process has been interrupted.

The Institution is under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. The academic programs in all schools are governed by the faculty. The student government constitution is largely administered by the students themselves.

The Lenoir-Rhyne Student Honor Commitment and Statement of Academic Integrity

All students at Lenoir-Rhyne University are expected to know and agree to accept the following Lenoir-Rhyne University Student Honor Commitment and Statement of Academic Integrity:

A fundamental purpose of a liberal education is its attempt to cultivate in the student a sense of honor and high principles pertaining especially to academics, but extending to all areas of life. An inherent feature of Lenoir-Rhyne University is its commitment to an atmosphere of integrity and ethical conduct. As a student of Lenoir-Rhyne University, I accept as my personal responsibility the vigorous maintenance of honesty, truth, fairness, civility, and concern for others.

My devotion to integrity demands that I will not cheat in academic work and that I adhere to the established and required community code of conduct. I accept the responsibility for upholding the established standards against those who would violate them. And I understand and accept the consequences of infracting upon or assisting others in infracting upon this code. In addition to and beyond the requirements of any code or law, I affirm my own commitment to personal honor and integrity in all matters large and small. Even though the ideal of honor is an abstract one, by implementing this ideal, I join the men and women of Lenoir-Rhyne University in making the concept of honor a reality.

The Academic Integrity System

All contributors to Lenoir-Rhyne University-students, faculty, staff, and administrators-are charged to support and to cultivate the principles established in our honor commitment and statement of academic integrity. The Academic Integrity System promotes an educational community based upon honesty, personal and social responsibility, and honor. Each participant in this community must understand that it is her/his responsibility, individually and collectively, to uphold the values of academic integrity at Lenoir-Rhyne University and that all forms of dishonesty profoundly violate these values.

Lenoir-Rhyne University seeks to cultivate continually a learning community in which integrity may flourish. To these ends, the University seeks to define academic dishonesty, to establish standards and expectations of action, and to develop and utilize consistent and reasonable processes for adjudication of any violations of these values.

Violations of Academic Integrity

Violations of the Academic Integrity Statement fall under the jurisdiction of the University Judicial System and are subject to the rules and guidelines established in the Student Handbook.

The following offenses constitute academic integrity violations at Lenoir-Rhyne University:

  1. Cheating:
    1. Individual Cheating: To practice or attempt to practice dishonesty or deception in the taking of tests or in the preparation or submission of academic work purporting to be one’s own; to copy or attempt to copy from another person’s test, paper, or other graded work in a course; to use or to provide any notes or other prepared materials that a student is not permitted to consult during a testing period or to bring those materials into the testing area with the intent to use; to submit identical or near-identical papers or course work for credit in more than one course without prior permission of the instructor; to steal, deface, or destroy any research materials or technology that may deprive others of their use; to obstruct or interfere with another student’s academic work; to retain, possess, or circulate previously used exams or other assignments without the instructor’s permission.
    2. Collusion (action taken by two (2) or more persons together to cheat): To allow another to copy one’s tests, papers, or other graded course work; to provide assistance to others in the preparation of graded course work without the express consent of the instructor; to aid or abet another person in an act of cheating.
  2. Lying:
    Committing a forgery or uttering a statement known to be false or dishonest, orally or in writing, for the purpose of, or having the effect of, protecting or improving one’s grades in a course, or one’s academic record, or one’s academic standing; also, to make a statement known to be false or deceitful in a University Judicial proceeding or to protect another person from apprehension or punishment for a violation of academic integrity.
  3. Plagiarizing:
    The act of copying a sentence, several sentences, or a significant part of a sentence from any source, including Internet sites, that has been written by someone other than the person submitting the paper, and then neglecting to indicate through the use of quotation marks or blocking that the material has been copied; also, copying from another writer in such a way as to change one or two of the words in the sentence, or to rearrange the order of the wording, or to paraphrase, or to summarize information and then neglect to furnish documentation. Failure to cite sources when appropriate is a form of dishonesty.
  4. Impeding an investigation:
    Falsifying information, or attempting to falsify information, or intimidating participants in an academic integrity investigation or hearing.
  5. Any other actions that violate student regulations as outlined in The Cub or Student Handbook or public statutes for the purpose of leading to or supporting an academic integrity violation will come under the jurisdiction of the University Judicial System.

Responsibility for Academic Integrity

The chief responsibility for student academic integrity at Lenoir-Rhyne University rests with the students. Additionally, every faculty member assumes the responsibility for upholding and assisting in administering the honor commitment. To manifest the fullest confidence in the integrity of Lenoir-Rhyne students, it is essential that faculty create an atmosphere of support for the Academic Integrity System. Instructors are expected to giving clear directions regarding assignments, to maintain the integrity and security of examinations, to clarify expectations related to collaborative student work and/or any assignments using tutors, and to promote in all class assignments an atmosphere of mutual trust. Every faculty member is responsible for proctoring, or having proctored, quizzes, tests, and examinations. Students may not proctor a quiz, test, or examination for a class of which they are a member.

Students have a responsibility to ensure the integrity of their own work. If cheating, lying, or plagiarism is observed in an academic situation, a student should inform the faculty member, the Office of the Dean of Students, or the Office for Academic Affairs.

The faculty member may require that the student write a pledge on all work submitted in the course. If the professor makes no such demand, students may reinforce their commitment to high standards of academic integrity by writing the word PLEDGE and signing the work, or the student may write out a pledge and sign the work. An accepted form for a written pledge is: “I have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this work.”

Guide to Judicial Procedures

Confrontation

Any member of the Lenoir-Rhyne University community may confront a violation of the Honor Commitment and Statement of Academic Integrity if s/he believes there is information to support such a report. If a student or staff member believes a violation has occurred, s/he may:

  • Inform the faculty member in whose class the alleged violation occurred;
  • Urge that the individual confess the violation to the faculty member or other appropriate administrator.
  • File an Incident Report Form with the faculty member in whose class the violation occurred or with the Office of the Dean of Students. Forms are available in the Office of the Dean of Students, the Office for Academic Affairs, and the various school administrative offices.

If a faculty member believes a violation of the Integrity Pledge has occurred, s/he should:

  • Give the student an Incident Report Form for Academic Integrity Violations as notification that s/he is suspected of a violation and then meet with the student to give her/him an opportunity to accept or deny responsibility.
  • At this meeting the faculty member may adjudicate the violation or inform the student of the faculty member’s intent to refer it for adjudication by the Student Conduct Council. Regardless of who adjudicates the incident, all documentation related to the incident including the Incident Report Form, copies of the test/paper/project, a narrative of the situation, and other supporting materials should be sent to the Office of the Dean of Students. A copy of the Incident Report should also be provided to the Office for Academic Affairs. A student’s violation of the Academic Integrity system always must be reported to the Office of the Dean of Students and the Office for Academic Affairs.

Fact-Finding and Adjudication

When faced with a possible violation of academic integrity, the faculty member has two potential approaches in the adjudication of the action. He/she may address the matter directly or may refer the matter to the Student Conduct Council for consideration. Regardless of which approach is taken, unless otherwise noted, all rights and responsibilities outlined in this handbook are applicable.

Faculty Member as Adjudicator

If the faculty member chooses to adjudicate the incident, s/he will follow the procedures listed below:

  1. If the student accepts responsibility, the faculty member may determine sanctions and communicate a response (skip to #7 below).
  2. If the student denies responsibility, the faculty member will conduct an Inquiry, in which he/she will determine the student’s responsibility and appropriate sanction. At the meeting to report findings from the Inquiry, both the student and the faculty member are permitted to have one other person at the session, who may observe only. (This participation is limited to faculty, staff, and student members of the university community whose names are communicated to the faculty member at least 24 hours prior to the meeting. No representation by attorney or any other outside person is permitted.)
  3. During the Inquiry report, all documentation/materials related to the incident will be reviewed. This includes the definitions of academic dishonesty outlined in the Academic Integrity System, tests, papers, correspondence, or other paperwork pertinent to a determination of responsibility.
  4. The student may respond to the allegation, address documentation and clarify or add other information for consideration.
  5. The faculty member will determine if the student is responsible for the violation. After all information has been discussed, the faculty member may excuse the student for a few minutes in order to determine an appropriate judicial response, or the faculty member may require the student to return for a second meeting at which time the judicial response will be communicated. The faculty member may determine that a student is responsible for conduct when he/she determines that a preponderance of the evidence supports that conclusion. A preponderance of the evidence exists when the evidence supports the conclusion that it is “more likely than not” that the student engaged in the misconduct.
  6. If the student is found responsible, the faculty member will identify an appropriate sanction, as outlined in the section below.
  7. The faculty member will communicate his or her decision verbally and in a follow-up letter that includes a description of the Appeal Process (see below). This letter must be sent within 48 hours of the initial communication of the decision to the student.
  8. All documentation (including a copy of all correspondence, a completed Incident Report Form, the faculty member’s summary, copies of assignments, and any other materials used to determine responsibility and response) will be sent to the Office of the Dean of Students to be maintained in the student’s file. A copy of the Incident Report should be provided to the Office for Academic Affairs at the same time.

Student Conduct Council as Adjudicator

If the faculty member decides to refer the incident to the Student Conduct Council (SCC) to adjudicate, it will follow the procedures listed below:

  1. Within 48 hours of meeting with the accused, the faculty member will refer the Incident Report Form to the Office of the Dean of Students, who will refer the report to the Chief Judicial Officer. The accused student will be provided a designee from the Judicial Affairs Office to assist and answer any questions about the judicial process. No representation by attorney is permitted.
  2. The Judicial Affairs Officer shall furnish a notice of the time and place of the hearing to the parties involved (accused student and the filer of the report) and to the appropriate members of the Court at least four (4) days in advance.
  3. Normally, all cases must be heard within ten (10) class days upon return of the Incident Report Form to the accuser by the faculty member. Exceptions to this deadline may be allowed if deemed necessary by the Judicial Affairs Officer.
  4. Persons who may attend the inquiry are the filer of the report, the accused student, the faculty member in whose class the incident occurred, others with information pertinent to the incident, SCC members, and other impartial observer(s) at the discretion of the Council. The inquiry will be audiotape recorded for the use in the appeals process, if needed. The Office of the Dean of Students keeps these tapes.
  5. Judicial proceedings of the SCC shall be closed to the University community unless an open hearing is specifically requested and agreed upon by both parties involved.
  6. The Chair of the Council shall preside and open the inquiry with an explanation of procedures and purpose. He/she shall read the Incident Report Form aloud.
  7. Accused, Accuser, and their witnesses will be required to swear or affirm that their testimony will be true and honest before it is presented to the SCC.
  8. Both parties shall be given an opportunity to present evidence in the form of materials, oral testimony, papers or witnesses.
  9. Members of the Council shall have the opportunity to question those persons appearing before the Council.
  10. When there has been sufficient discussion of the case, members of the Council shall meet in private session to consider the case.
  11. Once the proceedings have been completed and the judicial body has met for the specific purpose of making a final decision, a recess shall not be called until a decision has been reached.
  12. In the Student Conduct Council, a majority decision shall be required for the determination of responsibility. Each member of the Council may determine that a student is responsible for conduct when he/she assesses that a preponderance of the evidence supports that conclusion. A preponderance of the evidence exists when the evidence supports the conclusion that it is “more likely than not” that the student engaged in the misconduct.
  13. If an individual is found responsible, a sanction shall be assigned by a majority vote of the Council. The SCC may draw upon the listing of possible sanctions as outlined below. Every attempt shall be made to assign sanctions according to the particular circumstances of each case.
  14. After the SCC has reached its decision, the participants previously recessed shall be recalled and shall be informed of the decision and the assigned sanction, if any. If the accused is found responsible, the appeals process will be explained.
  15. The absence of the Accused from a hearing shall be considered an admission of responsibility.
  16. Details pertaining to SCC hearings and decisions are confidential.
  17. If the SCC concludes that a student has been involved in an academic integrity violation, the Office for Academic Affairs and the Office of the Dean of Students must be notified, in writing, of the violation within three (3) days of the actual hearing.
  18. If, upon notification and review, it is determined that the person has been previously found responsible for a major violation of academic integrity, along with the sanctions imposed in this particular case, he/she may be expelled from the University at the discretion of the Executive Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the University. This decision shall be reported to the student, in writing, no more than one week after the SCC’s decision.

Sanctions

One of the fundamental principles of integrity is the willingness to assume responsibility for inappropriate actions. For this reason, the University may consider with varying degrees of favor one’s willingness to accept voluntarily responsibility for violations of the Academic Integrity code in the determination of sanctions.

The following sanctions may be imposed by the University Judicial System (faculty member or SCC) for violations of academic integrity at Lenoir-Rhyne University:

  1. A person who accepts responsibility or is found responsible for a violation of academic integrity in which the circumstances do not merit the imposition of a grade of ”F” in a course (e.g., a minor first offense) will receive at least the penalty of academic integrity probation. He/she may also receive a failing grade on the particular assignment under review, if deemed appropriate by the faculty member or the SCC.
  2. A person who accepts responsibility or is found responsible for a major first violation of academic integrity in a course may be dropped from the course with a grade of ”F” and may be subject to an additional penalty including suspension or expulsion, depending on the magnitude of the offense. S/he will receive additionally at least the penalty of academic integrity probation.
  3. A person who accepts responsibility or is found responsible for a violation of academic integrity in which the circumstances do not permit the imposition of a grade of ”F” in a course (e.g., a charge against a student not enrolled in a particular course) may receive a penalty ranging from academic integrity probation to suspension or expulsion, depending on the magnitude of the offense.
  4. A person who accepts responsibility or is found responsible for an additional violation of academic integrity after having been found responsible for a previous offense may be expelled from the University at the discretion of the Provost of the University. After the second violation, a grade of ”F” shall be entered for any courses in which a violation occurred. In cases of a second violation, it shall be the normal sanction that the student receives at least suspension from the University for at least one full semester. Readmission following a suspension is not guaranteed: the student must furnish to the satisfaction of both the Provost and the Dean of Students evidence that s/he understands her/his actions and that the University can be confident that subsequent violations of the Academic Integrity code will not occur.

Definition of Sanctions

  1. Academic Integrity Probation takes effect after one’s first academic integrity violation and extends from the time of the conviction until the student meets the necessary requirements to remove the probationary status from her/his academic transcripts. Any further conviction may result in suspension or expulsion.
  2. Academic Integrity Suspension is the immediate involuntary withdrawal of a student from the University for a time specified by the University Judicial System. The time must be at least one grading period during the academic year. Notation of this penalty shall be maintained on the student’s permanent academic transcript. No means of petition is available to remove this notation from one’s permanent transcripts.
  3. Academic Integrity Expulsion is the immediate permanent withdrawal of a student from the University. Notation of this penalty shall be maintained on the student’s permanent academic transcript. No means of petition is available to remove this notation from one’s permanent transcripts.

Upon being found responsible for a first violation (that does not result in suspension or expulsion), a student will be placed on academic integrity probation. S/he will receive a letter of notification from the Office for Academic Affairs, and the probation will be noted on the student’s transcripts. This notation will remain on the student’s academic record until s/he carries out the necessary actions to have it removed from her/his permanent transcripts. Additional academic integrity violations shall result in a permanent notation on the student’s transcripts.

Failure to receive or to review one’s letter of notification after a first academic integrity violation may not in any way serve as a mitigating factor in the determination of sanctions for a subsequent violation of the academic integrity code.

A student who is on Academic Integrity Probation may petition the Provost to have this notation removed from her/his Permanent Transcripts through the following process:

  1. The student continues matriculation for at least one year after receiving academic integrity probation with no subsequent recorded violations of the Academic Integrity Code. If the student intends to graduate in less than a full year after receiving probation, s/he may make similar petition during the last month before graduation.
  2. The student furnishes the Provost with a written justification requesting removal from academic integrity probation. This petition for removal of probation must furnish a cogent argument that demonstrates that the student has learned from these events and will not repeat these improper actions again in the future.
  3. The Provost will review the petition and may also meet face-to-face with the student. If s/he determines that the petition satisfies the requirements for removing probationary status, s/he will inform the University Registrar to remove the notation from the student’s permanent transcripts.
  4. If the student’s petition fails to demonstrate grounds for removing probationary status, s/he may re-submit a new petition no sooner than six months later, or in her/his last month before graduation, whichever comes first.
  5. If a student does not successfully petition for removal of academic integrity probation before departing the University (through graduation or a decision not to return), the notation of academic integrity probation will remain on her/his permanent transcripts.

FX Grade

The grade of FX denotes a violation of Lenoir-Rhyne University’s Academic Integrity Code that is egregious enough to warrant the sanction of both failure of the course and notation of the incident on the student’s permanent academic record. This sanction is reserved for only the most serious offenses and would be applied in cases of pre-meditated, significant, and clear violation of the University’s Academic Integrity Code. The FX grade will be treated like an F grade in the student’s grade point average. Any use of the FX grade will be reviewed by the Provost. An FX grade may be changed to an F grade on the student’s transcript in a subsequent semester before graduation by order of the Provost after the student has met the following requirements:

  • The student retakes the course in which the FX was received and successfully completes it with a passing grade; if the course is not offered before the student intends to graduate, the student may request a waiver of this expectation from the Provost.
  • The student has no subsequent recorded violations of the Academic Integrity Code.
  • The student furnishes the Provost with a written justification requesting the removal of the FX grade.

Any additional academic integrity violations by the student after receiving an FX grade will constitute grounds for immediate and permanent expulsion from the University.

Appeal

If an individual who is found responsible for violations of the academic integrity wishes to make appeal, the appeal form must be completed and filed with the Office of the Dean of Students within seventy-two (72) hours after the date in which the student receives the letter indicating responsibility and sanctions (or 72 hours after receiving notification from the Office for Academic Affairs of suspension or expulsion).

One’s right to seek appeal does not necessarily imply that an appeals hearing will be held. When an Appeal is filed, the basis or bases of the appeal must be indicated. There are four bases for appeal:

  • The evidence did not warrant the decision;
  • The decision did not warrant the sanction;
  • Proper procedures were not followed that may have had a bearing on the decision;
  • There was possible bias/prejudice on the part of one or more of the hearing officers that may have had a bearing on the decision.

The Associate Dean of Students will review the validity of the appeals request. In order for an appeal to be considered valid, the student or faculty member must explain how his/her reasons for appealing have the potential to change the original finding by the SCC or by the faculty member who adjudicated the incident. Appeals without warrant will be denied; if there are no grounds under the criteria listed above for the appeal, additional consideration will be denied. If the Associate Dean of Students views the request as possessing potential validity, the appeal shall be forwarded, with all evidentiary materials, to the Provost.

It is not the purpose of the appeals process to rehear fully the proceedings of the original incident. In determining the outcome of the appeal (regarding the decision and/or the sanctions), an appellate body will rely upon a “reasonable person” standard: were the original decisions and/or sanctions imposed by the faculty member or the SCC conclusions that could be reached by a reasonable person, applying appropriate diligence and community standards, and reaching a proper standard of proof (i.e., preponderance of evidence standard)?

During the appeals inquiry, the Provost will review all evidence from the faculty member’s Incident Report Form and documents and/or the materials from the SCC hearing. The appellant will be permitted to present his/her reasons for appeal. The Provost may ask any questions of the appellant he/she believes to be relevant to the appeal.

Upon completion of appeals inquiry, the Provost may select one of the following courses of action:

  • Reverse the decision of the SCC or faculty member.
  • Uphold the decision but reduce the sanction (if any).
  • Uphold the decision but make the sanction (if any) more severe.
  • Uphold the decision and leave the sanction (if any) unchanged.

The Provost may not remand the incident to the original decision venue for re-consideration. He/she will report the decision to the student in writing within 48 hours of the determination. The Provost may reveal his/her reasoning for the decision but is not required to do so.

If the student or the faculty member involved believes that grounds for appeal of the Provost’s decision is in order, s/he must put such grounds in written form and deliver the written appeal to the chair of the University Judicial Review Board within 72 hours of receipt of the decision. All relevant materials from the previous hearing/inquiry of the SCC and/or faculty member shall be forwarded to the chair of the Judicial Review Board.

The chair of the Judicial Review Board shall examine the basis for the appeal and determine its validity. The chair shall decide either to uphold the decision of the Provost or to convene the Judicial Review Board to review the prior decisions. In case of suspensions or expulsions, the Judicial Review Board will automatically convene to review the appeal.

As in earlier appeals, it is not the purpose of the Judicial Review Board, as an appellate body, to rehear fully the proceedings of the original incident. In determining the outcome of the appeal (regarding the decision and/or the sanctions), an appellate body will rely upon a “reasonable person” standard: were the original decisions and/or sanctions imposed by the faculty member or the SCC and/or the appellate findings of the Provost conclusions that could be reached by a reasonable person, applying appropriate diligence and community standards, and reaching a proper standard of proof (i.e., preponderance of evidence standard.)

The Judicial Review Board may follow one of the four courses of action:

  • Reverse the decision of the Provost.
  • Uphold the decision but reduce the sanction (if any).
  • Uphold the decision but make the sanction (if any) more severe.
  • Uphold the decision and leave the sanction (if any) unchanged

A student who files an Appeal must receive a final decision within two weeks of the filing date, barring extenuating circumstances. The Chair shall provide to the parties in the appeal a written notification of the decision. The decision of the Judicial Review Board is final.

An appellate (student or faculty member) may withdraw an Appeal at any time prior to the beginning of a scheduled hearing.

Academic Standard Requirements

Grade

Grading in individual courses is the prerogative of the course instructor who will at the beginning of each term notify the students of the grading standards for each course.

At mid-term and at the end of each semester, grade reports containing all information deemed necessary are available for students via myLR online. Academic records may be withheld for failure to satisfy financial or other responsibilities on campus.

Course grades are averaged on a grade point average scale with the following values assigned to each letter grade:

A 4.0 points per semester hour
A- 3.7 points per semester hour
B+ 3.3 points per semester hour
B 3.0 points per semester hour
B- 2.7 points per semester hour
C+ 2.3 points per semester hour
C 2.0 points per semester hour
C- 1.7 points per semester hour
D+ 1.3 points per semester hour
D 1.0 points per semester hour
D- 0.7 points per semester hour
F 0.0 points per semester hour
W Withdrawal from course
WP Withdrawal Passing from the University
WF WF Withdrawal Failing from the University

To compute a grade point average, a student must multiply the credits for the course by point values for each grade received, total and divide that total by the number of hours (graded courses) taken. An average of 4.00 would indicate the student received all A’s, 3.00 a B average, 2.00 a C average, 1.00 a D average and below .70 is failing work.

Incomplete Grades

Students may be given an incomplete grade ”I” if, because of sickness or other extreme necessity, some specific portion of their work remains unfinished, provided they are passing the course.

Students receiving a grade of ”I” in a fall semester course must make up the deficiency before the following March 15; for an ”I” received in a spring semester or Summer Session course, students must make up the deficiency before the following October 15. After these dates, the grade automatically changes to ”F”. Any grade adjustments resulting from completion of additional coursework must be completed within one year of the original posting of the incomplete grade. After this point the final grade will remain an “F.” The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee may require that a student remove an incomplete grade during the summer in order to remain enrolled. If the student receiving the grade of ”I” is not enrolled the following semester, the grade will become an ”F” after one additional semester. Instructors are not expected to allow students to make up work if the student has been out of school more than one year. The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee’s decisions are based on the academic record at the end of each semester. Incomplete grades are viewed as credits not officially earned, and any academic action stands for the following semester, even if the incomplete grades are completed.

FX Grade

The grade of FX denotes a violation of Lenoir-Rhyne University’s Academic Integrity Code that is egregious enough to warrant the sanction of both failure of the course and notation of the incident on the student’s permanent academic record. This sanction is reserved for only the most serious offenses and would be applied in cases of pre-meditated, significant, and clear violation of the University’s Academic Integrity Code. The FX grade will be treated like an F grade in the student’s grade point average. Any use of the FX grade will be reviewed by the Provost.

Grade Repeats

Students may repeat a course in which they received a grade of less than “C.” Special permission must be secured from the University Registrar to repeat a course in which a grade of “C” or better has been earned. All grades received are recorded on the permanent record, but only the grade received on the last attempt will be used in computing the grade point average. Students may repeat a maximum of 18 credits for grade substitution. If a course is repeated more than once, all repeated attempts would count toward the 18 credits allowed. For students who repeat more than 18 credits, only the first eighteen credits will be considered for grade substitution.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

In order to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress students must meet the following criteria:

  • Full-time students must pass at least nine (9) credits each regular semester.
  • Full-time students must meet minimum standards for credits earned and GPA as reflected in the following chart.
  • Full-time students must not fall below a semester GPA of 2.0 after the fourth semester.
  • Part-time students taking more than one course each regular semester must pass one-half of the credits attempted.
Semester 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Credits 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120 128 128
Earned GPA 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

Students not meeting standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress are subject to Academic Probation or Academic Suspension.

Responsibility for Satisfactory Academic Progress

The main responsibility for satisfactory academic progress rests with the students. Additionally, the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee enforces criteria for satisfactory academic progress. Faculty will administer grades at the mid-point and end of each academic semester for each student enrolled in a particular course. However, it is the responsibility of the student to ascertain their current academic standing in any class in which they are enrolled.

Student academic records and progress will not be discussed with any other person outside of faculty and staff of Lenoir-Rhyne University, including parents, unless a Student Disclosure Waiver is on file in the Registrar’s Office (see Student Disclosure Waiver below).

In addition to University requirements for satisfactory academic progress, some academic programs have additional academic requirements that students must meet in order to continue in these programs. These additional requirements supersede University requirements for continuation in these particular programs. Students not meeting these additional academic requirements may be removed from these particular programs. However, removal from a program does not necessarily mean removal from the University. As long as the University standards for satisfactory academic progress are met, a student may remain enrolled at Lenoir-Rhyne University.

Part-time students are subject to the same cumulative GPA criteria as full-time students in determining Satisfactory Academic Progress and should follow all listed requirements and definitions regarding procedures for Academic Probation and Suspension. However, part-time students are not subject to cumulative hours-earned criteria as reflected in the Satisfactory Academic Progress chart.

Academic Probation and Suspension

Any student, who fails to meet minimum standards for cumulative GPA, cumulative credits passed, or semester credits passed, is subject to Academic Probation or Academic Suspension.

Lenoir-Rhyne University requires students to have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in order to graduate. Lenoir-Rhyne has also established minimum criteria for satisfactory academic progress based on the number of semesters a student has been enrolled, the number of attempted credit hours, and the number of credit hours earned at Lenoir-Rhyne. The criteria can be found in the table above. Any student whose earned credits and cumulative average fail to meet the required criteria may be placed on Academic Probation or Suspension. Full-time students who pass less than nine credits in any semester are subject to Academic Suspension. Part-time students who take more than one course in a semester, and who pass less than one-half of the semester hours attempted, are subject to Academic Suspension.

Academic Probation

Full-time students who are not in compliance with Satisfactory Academic Progress standards listed above are subject to Academic Probation. Students placed on Academic Probation are expected to comply with all terms of Academic Probation. Students placed on Academic Probation will be monitored by the Office of Student Success and Retention and should work closely with this office as well as their Faculty advisor to ensure that they comply with all terms of their probation.

Students on Probation who fail to meet criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress are subject to one additional semester of Academic Probation or Academic Suspension. Determination of continued Academic Probation or Academic Suspension is the responsibility of the Faculty Committee for Admissions and Academic Standing.

Students on Academic Probation are permitted to continue participating in NCAA athletic activities, University Club Sports, Intramural activities and other University clubs and organizations unless a specific organization has a written policy stating otherwise (i.e. Honor’s Academy, Lineberger Fellows, etc.) Students placed on Academic Probation may not appeal the decision.

Academic Suspension

Full-time students who fail to meet criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress and/or the terms of their Academic Probation are subject to Academic Suspension. Academic Suspension requires that the student must not be enrolled at Lenoir-Rhyne University for one full Academic semester (not including summer).

Students placed on Academic Suspension may be subject to loss or reduction of Financial Aid (see Satisfactory Academic Progress and Financial Aid).

A full-time student facing Academic Suspension at the conclusion of the spring semester may be allowed to enroll in summer school at Lenoir-Rhyne University. If so, the student will be allowed to enroll in up to nine credits of summer school. If that student meets the Criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress by the conclusion of the second summer session, the student will be permitted to register for the fall semester but will remain on Academic Probation for the following semester. If the Criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress are not met but the student shows signs of significant academic improvement, the committee may permit the student to continue for one additional semester on Academic Probation. If the student chooses not to attend summer school the student will be subject to the punitive effects of Academic Suspension. Summer credits, both at Lenoir-Rhyne and outside institutions, must be preapproved by the Registrar’s Office.

A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne University after a one- semester period of Academic Suspension must notify the Office of Student Success and Retention for readmission criteria and procedures. A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne University after a two- semester period of Academic Suspension must apply for re-admission to Lenoir-Rhyne University through the Division of Enrollment Management.

Students continuing study after Academic Suspension will continue on Academic Probation until minimum standards under the prescribed Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart are obtained, and are subject to all of the terms of Academic Probation.

Full-time students who have been on Academic Suspension and are subsequently permitted to continue study but continue to perform below the criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress may be dismissed.

Appeal of Admissions and Academic Standing Committee Action

The institution recognizes that exceptional circumstances occasionally require consideration. The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee reserves the right to place any student on Academic Probation, Academic Suspension, or Expulsion at the conclusion of any semester. The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee further reserves the right to consider exceptional circumstances in decisions concerning removal of Academic Suspension status. In addition, students must appeal any loss or reduction of Financial Aid due to their Academic status separately from their appeal of Academic Suspension.

Notification concerning the Appeal process will be distributed to the student via their Lenoir-Rhyne email address and their permanent address of record following the decision of the committee to place the student on Academic Suspension. Students should read all available materials carefully.

Students placed on Academic Probation may not appeal the decision.

The details of the appeal process and deadline for submitting appeals of Academic Suspension are indicated in the letter of Academic Suspension sent to the students Lenoir-Rhyne email address and the permanent address of record. Appeals received after the deadline will not be reviewed by the committee. The decision following the appeal process is final.

Before any campus representative may talk to a student’s parent or guardian, the Student Disclosure waiver must be signed by the student and be on file in the Registrar’s Office. The student must sign and date the waiver and send a copy, either by fax (828-328-7368) or mail (Office of the Registrar, Lenoir-Rhyne University, Box 7277, Hickory, NC, 28603) before the deadline for the receipt of appeals. Copies of the Student Disclosure waiver are available in the Registrar’s Office and online. Students must complete the appeals process related to suspension as outlined in the letter of Academic Suspension. Students should keep a copy of all responses regarding the appeal that they submit. Appeals of Academic Suspension must be submitted:

By email: Student.Success@lr.edu
Attention: Director of Student Success and Retention

Notification of Committee Decision Regarding Appeal of Academic Suspension

Students who appeal their Academic Suspension will be notified by email and by mail of the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee’s decision regarding their appeal. Email notification will be sent within 24 hours of the committee meeting and the official letter will be sent within 36 hours of committee meeting. The date for committee appeal decisions is included in the original letter of Academic Suspension.

Results of Appealing Academic Suspension

The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee may either uphold the original suspension or rescind the suspension.

If the original suspension is rescinded, the student may continue as a student at Lenoir-Rhyne on Academic Probation during the following academic semester subject to all terms of Academic Probation (see Academic Probation). Students who have their Academic Suspension rescinded must also register for classes. They will not be allowed to register until they meet with a representative of the Office of Academic Affairs to review the terms of Academic Probation.

If the suspension is upheld, the student must sit out the following academic semester at Lenoir-Rhyne University. A full-time student facing Academic Suspension at the conclusion of the spring semester may be allowed to enroll in summer school at Lenoir-Rhyne University. If so, the student will be allowed to enroll in up to nine credits in summer school. If that student attains the needed GPA by the conclusion of the second session and/or shows signs of significant academic improvement, the student may be permitted to register for fall semester courses at the discretion of the committee. If the necessary GPA and/or significant progress is not obtained, or if the student chooses not to attend summer school at Lenoir-Rhyne University, the student may not attend fall semester. Summer school credits must be pre-approved by the Registrar.

Application for Readmission Following Suspension or Rescinding of Original Suspension

A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne University after a one- semester period of Academic Suspension must notify the Office of Student Success and Retention for readmission criteria and procedures. Continuation of study is allowed only if all conditions of suspension have been met as determined by the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee. A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne University after a two- semester period of Academic Suspension must apply for re-admission to Lenoir-Rhyne University through the Division of Enrollment Management. Readmission determinations are the responsibility of the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee. Students who are expelled may not apply for readmission.

While on suspension, students are strongly encouraged to enroll in college-level courses at an accredited institution to show intent for progress to the committee. These courses must be approved by the University Registrar prior to enrollment. Transcripts for work taken during the period of suspension must be included with the Application for Readmission. Approval of transfer work does not guarantee readmission to the University.

Students will be notified whether their applications for readmission have been approved or denied by a representative of the Division of Enrollment Management. If the application for readmission is approved, the student may enroll in classes at Lenoir-Rhyne University on Academic Probation (see Academic Probation above). If the application for readmission is denied, students will not be allowed to enroll in courses for the following semester at Lenoir-Rhyne University.

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Financial Aid

Students must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward a degree to remain eligible for Federal, State, and some forms of Institutional financial aid. Please note that SAP standards for financial aid are different from the SAP standards reviewed by the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee; students are responsible for understanding and adhering to both policies.

In order to maintain aid eligibility, students must complete and pass 66.7% of courses for which they receive aid, keeping them on pace to complete their program within 150% of the maximum timeframe required. Additionally, students must maintain a cumulative GPA consistent with the below chart.

Semesters Completed* 1 2 3 4 or more
Cumulative GPA Required 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0

*Semesters completed include coursework completed at other institutions as well as summer coursework

Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed each semester by the Office of Financial Aid and students who fail to meet the minimum standards will receive a Financial Aid Warning (notice to the student that continuing to achieve below satisfactory academic progress will result in a suspension of their aid). Students who fail to meet the minimum standards for a second consecutive semester will have their aid Suspended. Students whose aid has been suspended have the option to appeal this decision by following the instructions given in their notification letter. Appealing this decision will result in:

  • Denial; student must return to minimum SAP standards before receiving further aid
  • Probation; student can receive aid for one semester while attempting to return to minimum SAP standards
  • Academic Plan; student can receive aid contingent upon the successful drafting and completion of an academic plan, built in conjunction with their advisor and approved by the Office of Financial Aid, that is designed to get the student back to minimum SAP standards in a reasonable timeframe.

Appealing a Financial Aid Suspension

Students wishing to appeal a financial aid suspension may do so based on injury or illness, the death of a relative, or other special circumstances. When appealing, students should describe the basis for their appeal in detail and provide supporting documentation (doctor’s note, death certificate, etc.). The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow them to make satisfactory progress at the next evaluation. Students failing to meet the pace requirement should document a cumulative set of reasons that have impacted their ability to maintain proper pace and how they specifically will avoid these issues in future terms.

Repeated and Incomplete Coursework, Withdrawals, and Transfer Credit

Students may receive financial aid to repeat failed coursework as many times as needed until they have earned a passing grade. Students may only receive aid to repeat passed coursework one time. Please refer to the University Policy regarding repeated coursework to better understand how our GPA is impacted.

Incomplete coursework will be factored into the semesterly review of SAP as applicable. The Financial Aid office will consider whether an incomplete, if failed, could drop a student below SAP standards, and will notify the student accordingly. The student will have the opportunity to appeal the decision, but will also be reviewed again when the coursework has been completed. If the incomplete coursework does not pose a threat to the student’s maintaining SAP standards, that coursework will be considered reviewed for the semester, and the final grade will be considered as appropriate in future SAP reviews.

Courses from which a student withdraws are counted towards a student’s pace, but not towards GPA requirements. Likewise, transfer credits are counted toward pace, but are not factored into a student’s GPA.

Advisor

Each student at Lenoir-Rhyne University is assigned an academic faculty advisor from the school of the student’s major. Students who have not yet declared a major will be assigned to an advisor from a special group of faculty. Students are encouraged to seek the counsel of their advisors concerning matters related to their academic program each semester as a part of the registration process. Academic advisors may evaluate students’ situations and, if necessary, refer students to other campus counseling personnel or other resources for specific advice and information.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend classes and laboratories as specified by the instructor, who will state his or her attendance policy in writing at the beginning of the semester. No allowed number of absences is automatically granted to a student. Ordinarily, a student will not receive credit if 25% of the scheduled class meetings are missed.

Absences can only be excused by the professor of the course. Students absent from classes while representing the University, such as athletic teams or musical groups, are expected to be given the opportunity to complete missed work. Students who know in advance of certain absences should clear those absences and complete any work which will be missed prior to the absence.

The instructor may warn a student who has more absences than seem reasonable. Additional absences by the student may result in a request by the Provost to exclude the student from the class. Unexcused absences may result in the reduction of the student’s grade. Each faculty member has the prerogative of determining whether or not a student may miss the last class meeting before a holiday or the first meeting after a holiday and may effect a reduction in grade or assign additional work to the student who misses those classes.

The student who is absent from an announced quiz or examination, unless excused for cause (participation in recognized college activities, illness, or emergencies), may not be permitted to make up the quiz or examination.

WAITING FOR THE INSTRUCTOR: Students are expected to wait for the course instructor for at least 15 minutes.

Classification

The first-year student becomes a sophomore upon successful completion of two semesters and at least 28 semester hours of credit. The junior has completed four semesters and earned at least 60 semester hours; the senior has completed six semesters and earned at least 92 semester hours.

The Convocation Experience

Lenoir-Rhyne University’s Convocation Experience is designed to meet the various goals of the institution’s mission through educational opportunities beyond the traditional classroom. As a graduation requirement for all students enrolled full-time in a traditional program, these diverse experiences promote life-long habits of learning and reinforce Lenoir-Rhyne’s unique mission to develop the whole person, to liberate mind and spirit, to clarify personal faith, to foster physical wholeness, to build a sense of community, and to promote responsible leadership for service in the world.

Students meet the requirements for the program through verified attendance at a series of convocation events among a variety of lectures, fine arts productions, workshops, student activities, and other events. In total, students must complete at least ten (10) “experiences” during an academic year (fall and spring semester combined). Students are required to attend the opening President’s convocation and the final Honors convocation and to attend and/or participate in at least one experience from each of the eight categories.

The Convocation program is a graduation requirement for all full-time traditional students and, like other academic expectations, all experiences must be completed and verified prior to graduation. This policy applies every semester the student is enrolled full-time (twelve hours or more). If, during an academic year, the student is full-time in only one of the two semesters, the requirements for that year will be attendance at the campus-wide convocation during the semester in which s/he is a full-time student and at least four other convocations, chosen from four different categories.

If a student misses the opening President’s convocation, three (3) additional convocation requirements will be added to the current year’s requirement. If a student misses the closing Honor’s convocation, three (3) additional convocation requirements will be added to the following year’s requirements. (If the student intends to graduate during the academic year/semester in which s/he misses either of these convocations, the accrued requirements must be completed during the same year.) Should a student not complete the eight choice experiences by the end of the academic year, additional convocation requirements will be accrued equal to the number of experiences not completed and applied to the proceeding academic year. (The specific categories to be included in the accrued experiences will be determined on a case-by-case basis.)

Absences from either of the required convocations (opening and final honors) due to illness or other extenuating (emergency) circumstances must be verified by official documentation and approved by the University Convocation Committee.

A calendar of convocation events is provided to students at the beginning of each semester and updated regularly throughout the term on the University portal. Students are strongly encouraged to attend and/or participate in other campus-wide forums and chapel experiences beyond these minimum expectations.

In meeting convocation requirements, these events and/or experiences may not carry any credits toward meeting other academic requisites. These additional experiences must be satisfied by completing one experience from each of the eight categories:

Categories:

  1. Intellectual Development, which focuses upon expanding students’ understanding of the world through exploring various scholarly topics and/or contemporary issues from the academic perspective;
  2. Creative Development/Expression, which seeks to enhance, through attendance and/or participation, an appreciation of the visual and performing arts;
  3. Cultural Development, through which students explore and/or experience intercultural and/or international issues;
  4. Professional Development, which focuses on developing personal life skills, leadership abilities, or professional competencies or opportunities
  5. Health and Wellness Development, which cultivates students’ emotional/social development, and/or fosters physical well-being and healthy living;
  6. Spiritual Development, which promotes attentiveness to issues designed to deepen one’s understanding and/or clarify matters of personal faith; and
  7. Community Service and Awareness, which cultivates a spirit of community involvement, through service to the broader campus or local community and awareness of service initiatives, needs, and volunteer opportunities.
  8. Vocation Discernment, which encourages students to explore questions of vocational discernment.

Course Designation

Undergraduate courses are numbered at the 100, 200, 300, and 400-level. Graduate courses are numbered 500 and 600-level.

Course Load

Students must carry at least 12 hours each semester to be considered full-time students. An average of 16 hours per semester is needed to graduate within the normal period. Students enrolling in more than 16 hours as a first-year or more than 18 hours as a Sophomore, Junior or Senior must obtain approval from the Registrar. Forms for requesting overloads are available from the Registrar’s Office. Students must pay an additional fee (the current per-credit-hour rate for part-time students) for each credit hour taken beyond eighteen hours. No student with a GPA below 2.5 will be allowed to take overload hours.

Dean’s & President’s List

Dean’s List

In recognition of high academic achievement, a Dean’s List is announced each semester. The Dean’s List is composed of students with a grade point average of 3.50 to 3.89, provided no grade is below a ”C” and the student carried at least 12 hours of letter-graded courses. Students with incomplete grade(s) at the end of the semester are not eligible for the Dean’s List.

President’s List

In recognition of highest academic achievement, the President’s List is announced each semester. The President’s List is composed of students with a grade point average of 3.90 or better, provided no grade is below a ”C” and provided the student carried at least 12 hours of letter-graded courses. Students with incomplete grade(s) at the end of the semester are not eligible for the President’s List.

Graduation

To graduate from Lenoir-Rhyne University, students must complete a minimum of 128 credits with the last 32 earned at Lenoir-Rhyne University. Students transferring from two year institutions must complete a minimum of 64 credits including at least one-half of the major requirements at Lenoir-Rhyne University. Students transferring from a four-year institution must complete a minimum of 12 credits in the major and the last 32 credits at Lenoir-Rhyne University.

All students must earn a major and cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and complete all core and major course requirements. The major grade point average includes courses taken in the major field (except those specifically excluded from counting towards the major) and all courses required for the major even though the courses may be in another field.

One requirement is successful evidence of ENG 131  writing competency standards. Also some programs require students to take a comprehensive assessment examination in their major field of study. This examination will be taken in students’ final semester and will be administered by the programs.

Application for Degree Form

During spring semester of the junior year, the student must complete an application for degree form in the Registrar’s Office or on-line. This form requests information needed to conduct the degree audit and print the diploma. Failure to complete this form could mean a delay in receiving the diploma and omission from graduation exercises.

Graduation Attendance

Degrees will not be granted in absentia except by special authorization of the Provost on behalf of the faculty. Students seeking such authorization must petition the Provost in writing well in advance of the graduation date.

Students who complete all requirements for graduation at the end of the fall semester will participate in the December commencement ceremony. Students who complete all degree requirements in the summer term are also invited to participate in the December ceremony.

Students who complete all requirements for graduation in the spring semester will participate in the May commencement ceremony. Students who complete all degree requirements in the fall semester, but wish to participate in the May commencement ceremony must inform the Registrar of their intentions early in the fall semester and must register for at least one course at Lenoir-Rhyne University during the spring semester.

Graduation Honors

The graduating senior who earns the highest grade point average receives First Honors; the senior who earns the next highest grade point average receives Second Honors. In each case, the grade point average cannot be lower than 3.40.

A senior with a grade point average from 3.40 to 3.59 will graduate cum laude; with a grade-point average from 3.60 to 3.89 will graduate magna cum laude; with a grade point average of 3.90 or more, summa cum laude.

To qualify for graduation with honors, a student must earn a minimum of 64 semester hours in graded courses at Lenoir-Rhyne University.

Major Field Requirements

Each degree candidate selects a major field of study and completes a minimum of 30 credits in the major with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. Students must declare a major by or during the spring semester of their sophomore year. The specific courses required within each major are listed on the following pages with descriptions of the majors and the courses. Upon approval of the student’s advisor and respective School Chair, course substitutions may be made for major course requirements.

Minor Requirements

Students may select an academic minor(s) in areas other than the major field. Successful completion of at least 18 credits with a minimum of 2.0 grade point average is required. Transfer students must complete at least six credits in their minor at Lenoir-Rhyne University.

*Note: Students may also complete, beyond their required major field, a second major or a minor in another field. If a student wishes to complete a second major or a minor in a field that shares similar course requirements with the primary major, that student must successfully complete these common courses and all other requirements for both programs. A minimum of unique credits in the smaller major and/or the additional minor must be equal or greater than two-thirds of that major’s/minor’s standard number of required credit hours. Any exceptions to this policy will be noted in the descriptions of the specific major and/or minor field requirements. Students should refer to the particular program’s section in the catalog to determine if any special exceptions exist to this standard policy.

Second Lenoir-Rhyne Baccalaureate Degree

A student with a baccalaureate degree from Lenoir-Rhyne University may receive a second baccalaureate degree provided it is in a different major. The student must meet major requirements as outlined in the catalog in effect at the time of readmission for the second degree. In addition, a minimum of 32 semester hours, beyond the completion for the first degree and major, must be completed in residence at Lenoir-Rhyne University. Upon recommendation of the advisor and approval of the Provost, courses taken during the first degree and not used to satisfy requirements of that degree may be used for the second baccalaureate degree.

Institutional Credit

Institutional credit is awarded for MAT 070 ,  MAT 090  and MUS 090  , but does not count toward hours earned or the 128 credits required for graduation. Institutional credit is counted toward academic progress, financial aid, grade point average, and NCAA requirements.

Registration of Courses

Adding, Dropping, Withdrawing

  1. Drop/Add Policy
    Students may change their course schedule during the first five calendar days of each term with advisor approval. A course that is dropped during this period will not be listed on the transcript. Students in courses that meet only once per week may change their schedules at any time during the first two weeks of the term. Courses may not be added after the first week of term without instructor approval.
    It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the appropriate paperwork is completed and filed when dropping or adding a course. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the faculty advisor or the Registrar’s Office. Failure to complete the entire drop process could result in the grade of ‘F’ on the official transcript and the student being responsible for tuition and fees.
  2. Withdrawal from a Course
    Students may withdraw from courses during the first half of a term or semester with the approval of the advisor and instructor. Withdrawing from courses after the first week of classes (drop/add period) and prior to mid-term will result in grade of ‘W’ on the official transcript. It is important to note that withdrawing from a course after the drop/add period still counts towards a student’s billable hours.
    A student may not withdraw from any course after mid-term except under extenuating circumstances. Withdrawing from a course at this time requires approval of the faculty advisor and the Office of Academic Affairs. If withdrawal after mid-term is approved the instructor will assign a grade of ‘WP’ or ‘WF’ (according to the student’s performance up to the date of official withdrawal) and the grade will be notated on the official transcript. A grade of ‘WP’ has no influence on the students cumulative GPA, however, a grade of ‘WF’ will count the same as an ‘F’ in calculating the student’s GPA. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the appropriate paperwork is completed and filed when withdrawing from a course. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the faculty advisor or the Registrar’s Office. Failure to complete the entire withdrawal process could result in the grade of ‘F’ on the official transcript and the student being responsible for full tuition and fees.
    A student may not withdraw from a course after the final day of classes.
  3. Withdrawal from the University
    There are several reasons why a student might need to withdraw from the University; however, it is important that a clear understanding of the process and its consequences occurs before a final decision to leave the University takes place. Students are strongly encouraged to seek guidance from their faculty advisor and/or the Office of Student Success & Retention during the decision-making process. Should the final decision be to officially withdraw from the University, students must complete the appropriate paperwork with the Office of Student Success & Retention. The official date of withdrawal is defined as the date in which the student initiates contact with the Office of Student Success & Retention and/or the date in which said office becomes aware of the withdrawal from another university official.
    It is important to realize that there are financial consequences to withdrawing after the drop/add period which will vary based upon the official date of withdrawal. These consequences will be discussed during your exit interview with a representative of the Office of Student Success & Retention. (See Refund and Withdrawal Process below). It is imperative the entire withdrawal process is completed prior to the student’s departure. Failure to complete the process could result in failing grades and responsibility for full tuition and fees for the semester. In considering withdrawal from the University, be advised of the following:
    • A student who withdraws from all courses during the drop/add period (typically the first five days of classes) receives no academic or financial penalties. In this case, the student’s class schedule is completely dropped from the academic record, proof of registration will not appear on the student’s official transcript, and the student is eligible for full refund of any payment made for the semester.
    • A student who withdraws from all courses during the first half of a mini-term or semester must have approval from the Office of Student Success & Retention. Withdrawal from courses after the first week (drop/add period) but prior to mid-term will result in a grade of “W” on the official transcript.
    • A student may not withdraw from any classes after mid-term except under extenuating circumstances. Withdrawing from courses at this time requires approval of the Office of Student Success & Retention. If withdrawal after mid-term is approved the instructor will assign a grade of ‘WP’ or ‘WF’ (according to the student’s performance up to the date of official withdrawal) and the grade will be notated on the official transcript. A grade of ‘WP’ has no influence on the students cumulative GPA, however, a grade of ‘WF’ will count the same as an ‘F’ in calculating the student’s GPA. Grade determinations for student withdrawals necessitated by serious illness, injury or similar emergencies will be made at the discretion of the Dean of Students and/or the Provost. 
    • A student may not withdraw from courses after the final day of classes.
  4. Withdrawal Refund Policies
    Students who withdraw from courses but remain full-time (12 credit hours or more) will see no change in their financial aid. Students whose enrollment status changes during the drop/add period will have their charges and financial aid adjusted accordingly. Students who drop to three-quarter or half-time after the drop/add period has ended will not experience a reduction in aid unless a corresponding reduction has been made to their charges based on an extraordinary circumstance. However, students should be aware that when determining satisfactory academic progress, the Division of Enrollment Management will factor in the courses from which they withdrew. Federal regulations require us to consider any courses for which financial aid was provided.
    For students who withdraw completely, the refund percentage is based on the official withdrawal date (date on which the student initiated withdrawal from the University through the Office of Student Success & Retention).
    After a student withdraws from Lenoir-Rhyne, a fair and equitable refund will be calculated according to the University Refund Policy as follows:
Tuition Refunds for Fall & Spring Semesters
For 16 Week Courses:  
100%   During the Drop/Add period
85%   During second week of classes
75%   During third week of classes
60%   During fourth week of classes
25%   During weeks five through eight
0%   After eighth week of classes
     
For 8 Week Courses:  
100%   During the Drop/Add period
60%   During second week of classes
25%   During weeks three and four
0%   After fourth week of classes
Tuition Refunds for Summer Semester
For 10 Week Courses:  
100%   During the Drop/Add period
80%   During second week of classes
70%   During third week of classes
50%   During fourth week of classes
25%   During fifth week of classes
0%   After fifth week of classes
     
For 5 Week Courses:  
100%   During Drop/Add period
50%   During second week of classes
25%   During third week of classes
0%   After third week of classes

*Note: for J-term course and May-mester refund schedule, please contact the Office of Student Accounts.

Prior to a refund check being issued to a withdrawn student, the University must first determine if any of the refund is due back to the Title IV Financial Aid Programs. According to the Federal Guidelines, the amount of refund due to the financial aid programs must be repaid before a refund check will be made to the student. The University reserves the right to modify the refund policy to comply with federal, state, and other regulatory bodies.

Refunds to Title IV Financial Aid Programs are distributed in the following order:

  1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan
  2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan
  3. Federal Perkins Loan
  4. Federal Parent Loan for undergraduate students (PLUS)
  5. Federal Pell Grant
  6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
  7. Other Federal Aid Programs

Auditing Courses

Auditing courses will be permitted only on the presentation of a written request stating the reason for the request; this must be signed by the University Registrar and approved by the instructor. The student will not be given a grade or receive credit for the course. Certain courses involving active student participation (e.g., laboratory courses, physical education activity courses, internships, independent studies) may not be audited.

The student must follow the regular requirements for registration and class attendance. The hours of the audited course will be counted and are subject to the overload rule. Only upperclassmen with a grade point average of 3.00 or better may audit for an overload.

Directed Study

Juniors, seniors, and graduate students may take regular Lenoir-Rhyne University courses on an individual basis, but only in instances of extenuating circumstances. Approval of the professor, school chair, and Provost is required. Junior and senior students with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 and graduate students who have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 may register for a maximum of one directed study per term and only when it is impossible for them to take the course at the time it is normally offered. Core courses, introductory courses, activity courses, and courses offered every semester may not be taken as a directed study. Registrations for directed study courses must be completed by the end of the normal drop/add period. Life Long Learning students may not register for a directed study course that is not part of their major.

Dual Enrollment

Students enrolled at Lenoir-Rhyne University may not take courses at another institution during the fall or spring semesters. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the University Registrar prior to the beginning of the term. Without prior approval, dually-enrolled courses from other institutions may not be counted to meet Lenoir-Rhyne University requirements. Policies related to maximum course load apply in cases of dual enrollment.

Independent Study

Juniors, seniors, and graduate students may take (under the guidance of a faculty member) courses designed to explore an area of interest which is not normally taught in the Lenoir-Rhyne curriculum. In order to register for an independent study course, students must have completed at least two courses in the discipline or disciplines represented in the study. In addition, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 for undergraduate and 3.0 for graduate students is required.

Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory Courses

Juniors and Seniors are permitted to register for a maximum of one course in each semester on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) basis, with the proviso that such courses may not satisfy requirements in a student’s major or minor, and that no course required in the core curriculum or designated “Honors” can be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Courses graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory may count towards elective credit for graduation. The designation “Satisfactory” is awarded only for work equivalent to a grade of ”C” or better. No more than 12 semester hours total may be taken on an S/U basis. The University Registrar shall be notified at the time of registration which courses, if any, are being taken on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory basis. Students who change majors and who find they have already completed courses on an S/U basis which are required in the new major may (1) have the Satisfactory grade converted to a grade of ”C”, (2) retake the course for a grade, or (3) at the direction of the program, complete a substitute course.

Summer School Approval (Off Campus)

Students considering summer school enrollment at other institutions must request prior approval from the University Registrar to ensure transferability. Approval forms are available in the Registrar’s Office and on-line. Students who wish to use financial aid must speak with the Office of Financial Aid prior to enrollment.

Credit hours for satisfactory completion (grade of “C” or better) of courses taken at other institutions will count toward graduation requirements, however the grades earned will not count towards the Lenoir-Rhyne University cumulative grade point average.

Testing Out of Courses

Credit by Examination

Lenoir-Rhyne University recognizes that some entering students may have had:

  1. Classroom course experiences above the secondary level (at a technical institute, armed forces school, etc.) that are equivalent to Lenoir-Rhyne University courses, but for which transfer credit is not feasible, and/or
  2. Secondary school experiences which indicate they possess knowledge and skills equivalent to LenoirRhyne University courses, and/or
  3. Personal learning experiences in areas related to Lenoir-Rhyne University courses.

For these reasons, Lenoir-Rhyne University makes available an opportunity for students to obtain credit for certain courses in its curricular offerings through credit by examination.

Certain courses do not lend themselves to credit by examination and, therefore, academic programs, in consultation with the Academic Program Committee, will determine those courses for which the credit by examination option is not available. Generally, credit for internship, directed study, research, field experience, and honors courses is not possible by credit by examination. Also, no physical education activity courses are available for credit by examination. A current, complete list of Lenoir- Rhyne University courses excluded from the credit by examination option will be available in the offices of the Registrar and Provost. This list will be updated periodically.

Students must file an application for credit-by-exam (available at http://registrar.lr.edu/forms pay the $200 fee, and permission must be obtained in advance from the School Chair and the Provost. A minimum 30 day waiting period will exist between the date of application and the administration of the examination. Results from the examination will be reported to the Provost and then to the University Registrar. Applications must be made no later than mid-term of any semester, and no applications will be accepted later than the withdrawal date of the student’s next to last semester. Credit- by-exam in 100-level courses must be completed by the end of the sophomore year or by the end of the first year for transfers. Additionally, the following rules apply:

  • No more than 16 hours may be taken in a student’s degree program as credit-by-exam,
  • No more than 8 hours in the major may be taken as credit-by-exam,
  • No more than 8 hours in any one semester may be taken as credit-by- exam.

Students who demonstrate competencies at a level consistent with that necessary to earn a grade equivalent at least to a ”C” in the course(s) shall receive academic credit, but no grade for the course. Credit by exam is evaluated only on a satisfactory/ unsatisfactory basis. No letter grades will be assigned to credit obtained in this manner and, thus, the grade point average will not be affected. A failed exam may not be repeated within the same semester. A student who fails a credit by examination for a specific course may later enroll in that course with no penalty.

Appeals of any credit by examination policies will be heard by the Academic Program Committee.

The existing rules requiring transfer students to complete 12 semester hours in their major and earn the last 32 hours of their course work at Lenoir-Rhyne University will remain in effect.

Advanced Placement

  

College Level Examination Program

  

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is a rigorous pre-university course of study that meets the needs of the highly motivated and academically gifted secondary school student. The program allows its graduates to fulfill requirements for the various international systems of education.

Lenoir-Rhyne University recognizes the value of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the significant achievement of those students who complete the program. The IB Program is administered by the Office of the Provost, the Registrar’s Office, and the Schools concerned. The University awards credit for IB work according to the following policy:

  1. Lenoir-Rhyne University will award academic credit for satisfactory IB work for students who have been awarded the IB diploma and for those who have achieved a certificate for successful completion of IB subjects.
  2. Academic credit will be awarded for grades of 4 or higher on Higher Level (HL) subjects and for grades of 5 or higher on Subsidiary Level (SL) subjects.
  3. A maximum of six credits of Lenoir-Rhyne University course work will be awarded for Higher Level subjects in which grades of 4 or higher are achieved.
  4. A maximum of three credits of Lenoir-Rhyne University course work will be awarded in Subsidiary Level subjects in which grades of 5 are achieved. A maximum of six credits will be awarded in SL courses in which a grade of 6 or 7 is achieved.
  5. Additional credit may be awarded to students in the area of their extended essay if the student has written a successful essay and has received a notation of 0+, 1+ or 2+. No credit is possible for a student who receives a notation of 1-. Determination of appropriate specific credit is made by the Provost in consultation with the chairperson of the department in the area of the extended essay.
  6. A maximum of 30 credits of specific course work (as determined by the Provost in consultation with appropriate School Chair) will be awarded to the student who has qualified for and has been awarded the IB Diploma. Students who failed to achieve the IB Diploma but who have achieved certification in certain IB subjects will have the opportunity to receive academic credit for the subject as determined by the Provost and the appropriate School Chair.

Experiential Education

Many important student learning outcomes desired by Lenoir-Rhyne University are acquired in non-classroom settings. Broadly conceived, experiential education encompasses a wide range of curricular and co-curricular activities which assist students in their personal growth and development, provide opportunities for career exploration, or develop work-related competencies.

Lenoir-Rhyne University recognizes the following basic types of experiential learning opportunities:

Professional: Students serve in assigned responsibilities under the supervision of a professional while receiving appropriate instruction putting theory into practice, developing job-related skills, and synthesizing knowledge, skills, and values. Such areas include, but are not limited to, the fields of education, nursing, psychology, social work, and Christian education.

Career Exploration: Students work in a supervised placement to perform a useful service, to analyze the career possibilities inherent in such tasks, and to develop employment-related skills. The educational institution provides the means for structured reflection, analysis, and self-evaluation; the agency provides an evaluation of the students’ work and career potential.

Service/Personal Learning: Students undertake a program in an on or off- campus setting that is designed to further their personal growth and development. Such experiences include, but are not limited to, field research, outdoor or wilderness education, travel/study, and other areas.

Guidelines:

  1. The experiential learning activity must be associated with an academic program in a clearly defined and identifiable way and must have the advanced approval of the related academic department.
  2. Learning activities must be carefully planned and supervised. Supervision will be provided by a faculty member(s) with competence in the area of the learning activity and/or, when appropriate, by a programapproved, field-based supervisor.
  3. The expected goals of the experiential learning opportunity must be clearly stated.
  4. Student performance must be carefully evaluated by faculty and other supervisors, and assigned grades shall be noted on official transcripts. Unless they are used to fulfill major requirements, such courses will normally be graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
  5. No more than 12 credit hours in experiential learning may be counted toward the 128 credit hours graduation requirement, except in the case of major programs (e.g., student teaching, nursing) which require more than 12 hours in experiential education.
  6. Proposed additions of experiential learning courses to the curriculum must follow the regular process of endorsement by the appropriate academic School, Academic Program Committee, and Faculty Assembly. Within the general rubrics of an approved course, specific learning opportunities may vary; therefore, records of such individual student experiences will be kept on file by the supervising faculty member.
  7. No more than one credit hour will be awarded for each 35 hours of approved experiential learning.
  8. Credits may not be awarded for experiential learning opportunities that do not have prior institutional evaluation and approval.
  9. In the event that a student desires academic credit for a type of experiential learning not related to currently approved experiential learning courses, he/she may undertake the following:
    1. solicit the cooperation and support of a faculty sponsor. Sponsorship reflects a belief in the legitimacy of the proposal and a willingness to supervise and evaluate the experience individually or in cooperation with other sponsors (e.g., campus or non-campus professionals).
    2. acquire necessary forms from the Provost’s Office and outline the goals to be achieved, procedures to be used, extent of activity to be pursued, and method of evaluation to be followed.
    3. submit the forms to the Provost’s Office for transmission to the Academic Program Committee and for its approval at least four (4) weeks prior to the beginning of the learning experience.
  10. Field experiences which currently exist as faculty-approved course offerings (e.g., student teaching, nursing) do not require Academic Program Committee approval. Students desiring such experiences follow the normal channels of registration.
  11. The preceding guidelines do not apply to traditional laboratory experiences.

Non-Credit Experiential Learning

Lenoir-Rhyne University affirms both the value and necessity of relating classroom and non-classroom learning opportunities in the quest of integrating liberal learning, vocational pursuits, and personal values. The University expects and encourages students to explore a variety of co-curricular activities as a vital aspect of their educational experience; however, students cannot expect that academic credit will be awarded for every aspect of their learning at the University. Lenoir-Rhyne University does not award academic credit for participation in intercollegiate or intramural athletics, cheer leading, various student organizations, and certain co- curricular activities.

The dimension of experiential education occurs in many courses offered by academic schools. Some majors include field experience and/or internships as requirements or elective. Students in consultation with faculty sponsors may devise independent studies with an experiential learning emphasis