Apr 24, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2023-2024 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2023-2024

Academic Regulations



UNIVERSITY CATALOG POLICY

Catalog Governance

The Lenoir-Rhyne University Catalog is published online annually to describe programs, resources and courses, and each catalog is valid for one year and is superseded by subsequent issues. Changes are primarily reserved for annual catalog publications, but the university reserves the right to make changes as needed and will announce any changes to the university community. All students are required to follow new university policy at the effective date of the policy; however, changes to academic requirements do not affect students already enrolled.

Catalog Year Requirements

For academic requirements, students will follow the catalog in effect at the time of their matriculation unless a change is formally requested. Students must meet the following catalog guidelines:

  • All academic requirements for graduation for major(s), minor(s) and general education must be met from the same catalog.
  • Students may officially change their catalog year by formally requesting this change from the Registrar’s Office with approval from their advisor and dean of the college of the major.
  • Students may only follow a catalog that was in effect during a term in which they were enrolled at the university.
  • Catalogs are valid for a period of 10 years.
  • In the event where programs are discontinued by the university, the college(s) will identify substitutions to meet remaining requirements.

Registration for classes at Lenoir-Rhyne University indicates a student’s acceptance of university policies.

 

HONOR COMMITMENT & ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

 
Each student and faculty member at Lenoir-Rhyne University is expected to exhibit conduct within the dictates of a Christian conscience and do what is right as a matter of choice rather than as a matter of compulsion.
 
Lenoir-Rhyne University, like every academic institution, has certain standards and policies adopted as guides for the conduct of general activities for both students and faculty members. These standards are outlined in the student and faculty handbooks. It is the responsibility of each student to learn and follow the standards, policies and regulations stated in the university catalog and student handbook. The university reserves the right to request the withdrawal of any student who fails in conduct or attitude to meet the regulations and policies adopted by the university.

The institution is under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. The academic programs in all schools are governed by the faculty. The student government constitution is largely administered by the students themselves.

The Lenoir-Rhyne Student Honor Commitment and Statement of Academic Integrity

All students at Lenoir-Rhyne University are expected to know and agree to accept the following Lenoir-Rhyne University Student Honor Commitment and Statement of Academic Integrity:

A fundamental purpose of a liberal education is its attempt to cultivate in the student a sense of honor and high principles pertaining especially to academics but extending to all areas of life. An inherent feature of Lenoir-Rhyne University is its commitment to an atmosphere of integrity and ethical conduct. As a student of Lenoir-Rhyne University, I accept as my personal responsibility the vigorous maintenance of honesty, truth, fairness, civility and concern for others.

My devotion to integrity demands that I will not cheat in academic work and that I adhere to the established and required community code of conduct. I accept the responsibility for upholding the established standards against those who would violate them. And I understand and accept the consequences of infracting upon or assisting others in infracting upon this code. In addition to and beyond the requirements of any code or law, I affirm my own commitment to personal honor and integrity in all matters large and small. Even though the ideal of honor is an abstract one, by implementing this ideal, I join the men and women of Lenoir-Rhyne University in making the concept of honor a reality.

The Academic Integrity System

All contributors to Lenoir-Rhyne University - students, faculty, staff and administrators - are charged to support and to cultivate the principles established in our honor commitment and statement of academic integrity. The Academic Integrity System promotes an educational community based upon honesty, personal and social responsibility and honor. Each participant in this community must understand that it is their responsibility, individually and collectively, to uphold the values of academic integrity at Lenoir-Rhyne University and that all forms of dishonesty profoundly violate these values.

Lenoir-Rhyne University seeks to cultivate continually a learning community in which integrity may flourish. To these ends, the university seeks to define academic dishonesty, to establish standards and expectations of action and to develop and utilize consistent and reasonable processes for adjudication of any violations of these values.

The Lenoir-Rhyne University Student Handbook has the full Academic Integrity System policies and procedures in the event there is a violation of these policies.

CREDIT SYSTEM

Course Designation

Undergraduate courses at Lenoir-Rhyne University are numbered at the 100, 200, 300 and 400 levels with each level roughly geared toward first-year through senior year. Courses numbered below 100 are considered for institutional credit only and do not count towards the 128 hours required to graduate. Institutional credit is counted toward academic progress, financial aid, grade point average and NCAA requirements.

Graduate courses are numbered at the 500 level and above and may not be taken by undergraduates without approval.

Credit Hours

The university measures the work done for courses by the credit hour (also called “semester hour”). Each credit hour is equivalent to 50 minutes per week of classroom or directed faculty instruction for a 15-week semester. Additionally, students are expected to work 100 minutes per credit hour outside of class each week. The credit hours for each course are indicated in the course description and in the registration system.
 

Time to Degree

All undergraduate degrees at Lenoir-Rhyne University require a minimum of 128 credit hours regardless of specific courses required for general education, major(s) and minor(s). Students must successfully complete at least 16 credit hours of usable credit each semester to graduate in eight semesters. There are some things that will affect time to degree, including dropping or withdrawing from courses or semesters; failing courses; changing majors or adding additional majors or minors; taking fewer than 16 hours of usable credit each semester; transferring institutions; delaying entrance to academic programs; failing to meet prerequisites; and taking extra courses.

Summer classes can be used to ensure a minimum of 32 credit hours have been earned in one academic year, to take required courses that were missed or to earn credits above the minimum required to graduate in 8 semester hours.

Classification

Student classification is determined by the total number of credit hours completed as indicated below:

First Year

0-29

Sophomore

30-59

Junior

60-89

Senior

90+

Credit Limitations

  1. Students may only earn up to 4 hours in directed study towards degree requirements.
  2. Students may only earn up to 3 hours of class assistantship towards the 128 hours required to graduate.
  3. Applying any credit for earned classes older than 10 years towards graduation requirements requires approval of the dean of the college of the major.
  4. Students may not major and minor in the same discipline.

FIELDS OF STUDY

Major Field of Study

Each degree candidate selects a major field of study and completes a minimum of 30 credits in the major with a minimum grade point average of 2.0. Students must declare a major by or during the spring semester of their sophomore year. The specific courses required within each major are listed on the following pages with descriptions of the majors and the courses. Upon approval of the student’s advisor and respective college dean, course substitutions may be made for major course requirements.

Minors

Students may select an academic minor(s) in areas other than the major field. Successful completion of at least 18 credits with a minimum of 2.0 grade point average is required. Students must complete at least six credits in their minor at Lenoir-Rhyne University. Students may not minor in the same field as their major (e.g., both major and minor in psychology is not allowed).

Adding Double Majors or Minors

Students may complete a second major or a minor in another field beyond their primary major field; students may not double major or add a minor in the same field as their primary major. If a student wishes to complete a second major or a minor in a field that shares similar course requirements with the primary major, that student must successfully complete these common courses and all other requirements for both programs. All residency rules must be met.

Subsequent Lenoir-Rhyne Baccalaureate Degree

A student with a baccalaureate degree from Lenoir-Rhyne University may receive a second baccalaureate degree provided it is in a different major by meeting all degree requirements with the following stipulations:

  1. All General Education requirements are considered to be met.

  2. All major and any minor requirements as outlined in the catalog in effect at the time of readmission for the second degree must be completed.
  3. Upon recommendation of the advisor and approval of the dean, courses taken during the first degree may be used for the second baccalaureate degree.
  4. A minimum of 12 hours in the major and 6 hours in the minor must be taken in residence at Lenoir-Rhyne.

Second Degree at Lenoir-Rhyne University with first degree from another university

Students who have earned a previous baccalaureate degree from an institution other than Lenoir-Rhyne University may complete another baccalaureate degree by meeting all degree requirements with the following stipulations.

  1. General Education is considered met.
  2. All major and any minor requirements must be completed satisfactorily.
  3. A minimum of 25% of the hours required for the degree must be taken in residence at Lenoir-Rhyne.
  4. A minimum of 12 hours in the major and 6 hours in the minor must be taken in residence at Lenoir-Rhyne.

REGISTRATION OF COURSES

Access to the Registration System

Registration for each semester takes place in the previous semester during the advising and registration time set forth on the academic calendar. Holds are placed on all students’ records to prevent registration prior to meeting with their advisor. Students must meet with their advisors prior to their registration time to have their advising hold removed in order to access the system.  The registration system opens for individual students on a rolling basis based on the number of completed, earned credit hours (not including the student’s current in-progress hours.) Once the system opens, it will remain open throughout the entire add/drop period.

Students with registration holds should review the Lenoir-Rhyne Student Handbook for more information.

Advisor

Each student at Lenoir-Rhyne University is assigned an academic faculty advisor from the college of the student’s major. Students who have not yet declared a major will be assigned to an advisor in BEAR Central. Students are encouraged to seek the counsel of their advisor concerning matters related to their academic program each semester as a part of the registration process. Academic advisors may evaluate students’ situations and, if necessary, refer students to other campus counseling personnel or other resources for specific advice and information.

Course Load and Overload

To be considered full-time, students must take at least 12 hours but may take up to 18 hours without permission during each fall or spring semester. Any course load above 18 hours is considered an overload. Students may seek permission for an overload from the dean of the college of their major.

In order to graduate with a minimum of 128 credit hours in eight semesters, students must average 16 credit hours each fall and spring semester. Taking fewer hours in fall and spring semesters may require summer school or additional semesters to complete degree requirements.

A student wishing to take an overload in the fall or spring semester must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 and receive approval from the dean of the college of the major. An overload above 21 credit hours is not allowed.

There is no additional cost for taking up to 21 credit hours in a fall/spring semester.

In the summer term, students may take up to 12 credit hours across the whole summer but may take no more than 9 credit hours in any one mini-term.

Adding, Dropping and Withdrawing

Drop/Add Policy
Students may change their course schedule during the drop/add period, which is the first five calendar days of each fall/spring term. Summer terms have specified dates to drop, which are published on the academic calendar. A course that is dropped during this period will not be listed on the transcript. Students in courses that meet only once per week may change their schedules at any time during the first two weeks of the term. Courses may not be added after the first week of the term without instructor approval.

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the appropriate paperwork is completed and filed when dropping or adding a course. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the faculty advisor or the Registrar’s Office. Failure to complete the entire drop process could result in the grade of “F” on the official transcript and the student being responsible for tuition and fees.

Withdrawal from a Course
Students may withdraw from courses during the first half of a term or semester with the approval of the advisor and instructor. The exact deadline for withdrawing from courses in a given term can be found on the academic calendar. Withdrawing from courses after the first week of classes (the drop/add period) and prior to mid-term will result in a grade of “W” on the official transcript. It is important to note that withdrawing from a course after the drop/add period still counts towards a student’s billable hours.

A student may not withdraw from any course after mid-term except under extenuating circumstances. Withdrawing from a course after this time requires approval of the faculty advisor and the Registrar’s Office, and for athletes, the NCAA Compliance Officer. If withdrawal after mid-term is approved, the instructor will assign a grade of “WP” or “WF” (according to the student’s performance up to the date of official withdrawal), and the grade will be notated on the official transcript. A grade of “WP” has no influence on the student’s cumulative GPA; however, a grade of “WF” will count the same as an “F” in calculating the student’s GPA. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the appropriate paperwork is completed and filed when withdrawing from a course. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the faculty advisor or the Registrar’s Office. Failure to complete the entire withdrawal process could result in the grade of “F” on the official transcript and the student being responsible for full tuition and fees.

A student may not withdraw from a course after the final day of classes.

Withdrawal from the University
There are several reasons why a student might need to withdraw from the university; however, it is important that a clear understanding of the process and its consequences occurs before a final decision to leave the university takes place. Students are strongly encouraged to seek guidance from their faculty advisor and/or BEAR Central during the decision-making process. Should the final decision be to officially withdraw from the university, students must complete the appropriate paperwork with BEAR Central. The official date of withdrawal is defined as the date in which the student initiates contact with BEAR Central and/or the date in which said office becomes aware of the withdrawal from another university official.

It is important to realize that there are financial consequences to withdrawing after the drop/add period which will vary based upon the official date of withdrawal. These consequences will be discussed during your exit interview with a representative of BEAR Central. (See Refund and Withdrawal Process in the Financial Information section of the catalog.) It is imperative the entire withdrawal process is completed prior to the student’s departure. Failure to complete the process could result in failing grades and responsibility for full tuition and fees for the semester. In considering withdrawal from the university be advised of the following:

  • A student who withdraws from all courses during the drop/add period (typically the first five days of classes) receives no academic or financial penalties. In this case, the student’s class schedule is completely dropped from the academic record, proof of registration will not appear on the student’s official transcript, and the student is eligible for a full refund of any payment made for the semester and any federal financial aid must be returned.
  • A student who withdraws from all courses during the first half of a mini-term or semester must have approval from BEAR Central. Withdrawal from courses after the first week (drop/add period) but prior to mid-term will result in a grade of “W” on the official transcript.
  • A student may not withdraw from any classes after mid-term except under extenuating circumstances. Withdrawing from courses after this time requires approval of BEAR Central. If withdrawal after mid-term is approved the instructor will assign a grade of “WP” or “WF” (according to the student’s performance up to the date of official withdrawal), and the grade will be notated on the official transcript. A grade of ‘WP’ has no influence on the student’s cumulative GPA; however, a grade of “WF” will count the same as an “F” in calculating the student’s GPA. Grade determinations for student withdrawals necessitated by serious illness, injury or similar emergencies will be made at the discretion of the Office of the Provost. 

A student may not withdraw from courses after the final day of classes.

Auditing a Course

Auditing courses will be permitted only on the presentation of a written request stating the reason for the request no later than the end of the drop/add period. This written request must be signed by the university registrar and approved by the instructor. Once a course is selected for audit, it may not be changed back to a credit-earning course. The student will not be given a letter grade or receive credit for the course. A grade of “AU” will be placed on the transcript.

Certain courses involving active student participation (e.g., laboratory courses, physical education activity courses, internships, independent studies) may not be taken under audit.

The student must follow the regular requirements for registration and class attendance. Students must pay regular tuition and fees for audited classes. The hours of the audited course will be counted toward course load and are subject to the overload rules.

Directed Study

Juniors, seniors and graduate students may take regular Lenoir-Rhyne University courses on an individual basis but only in instances of extenuating circumstances. Approval of the professor, college dean and provost is required. Junior and senior students with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 may register for a maximum of one directed study per term and only when it is impossible for them to take the course at the time it is normally offered. General education courses, introductory courses, activity courses and courses offered every semester may not be taken as a directed study. Registration for directed study courses must be completed by the end of the normal drop/add period. Life Long Learning students may not register for a directed study course that is not part of their major.

Independent Study

Juniors, seniors and graduate students may take (under the guidance of a faculty member) courses designed to explore an area of interest which is not normally taught in the Lenoir-Rhyne curriculum. To be eligible to register for an independent study course, students must have completed at least two courses in the discipline(s) represented in the study. In addition, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 for undergraduates and 3.0 for graduate students is required.

Opportunity for Undergraduates to Take Graduate Courses

Undergraduate students who have completed at least 90 credit hours may take up to 6 credit hours of graduate coursework with the following conditions:

  • Students may apply in any semester in which they will have earned a minimum of 90 credit hours.
  • Students must complete the Senior Permission to Enroll in Graduate Courses application found at https://www.lr.edu/academics/registrar.
  • Students must gain approval from their academic advisor, the graduate program coordinator of the requested graduate course(s), the dean of the college and the assistant provost of graduate education/dean of the graduate school.
  • Students must possess a cumulative LR GPA of 3.0/B or higher.
  • Students must meet all prerequisites for the requested graduate course(s).
  • Students cannot take more than 6 credit hours of graduate courses prior to the receipt of the bachelor’s degree.

Graduate courses may count either as electives or as major requirements as designated in the approval process.

Students participating in the Accelerated Master’s Program may take additional graduate level courses that can count toward both undergraduate and graduate degrees. More information about the Accelerated Master’s Program can be found elsewhere in this catalog.

Taking Courses at Other Institutions

Dual Enrollment

Students enrolled at Lenoir-Rhyne University may not take courses at another institution during the fall or spring semesters. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the university registrar prior to the beginning of the term. Without prior approval, dual-enrolled courses from other institutions may not be counted to meet Lenoir-Rhyne requirements. Policies related to maximum course load apply in cases of dual enrollment.

Summer School Approval

Students considering summer school enrollment at other institutions must request prior approval from the university registrar to ensure transferability. Approval forms are available in the Registrar’s Office and online. Students who wish to use financial aid must speak with the Office of Financial Aid prior to enrollment.

Only courses completed with a grade of C/2.0 or better will transfer back to Lenoir-Rhyne University for credit; however, the grades earned will not count towards the LR cumulative grade point average.

ALTERNATIVE CREDIT TYPES

Credit by Examination

Lenoir-Rhyne University recognizes that some entering students may have had:

  1. Classroom course experiences above the secondary level (at a technical institute, armed forces school, etc.) that are equivalent to Lenoir-Rhyne University courses, but for which transfer credit is not feasible, and/or
  2. Secondary school experiences which indicate they possess knowledge and skills equivalent to Lenoir-Rhyne University courses, and/or
  3. Personal learning experiences in areas related to Lenoir-Rhyne University courses.

For these reasons, Lenoir-Rhyne University makes available an opportunity for students to obtain credit for certain courses in its curricular offerings through credit by examination.

Certain courses do not lend themselves to credit by examination and, therefore, academic programs, in consultation with the Academic Program Committee, will determine those courses for which the credit by examination option is not available. Generally, credit for internship, directed study, research, field experience, and honors courses is not possible by credit by examination. Also, no physical education activity courses are available for credit by examination. A current, complete list of Lenoir-Rhyne University courses allowed as credit by examination option will be available in the offices of the registrar and provost. This list will be updated periodically.

Students must file an application for credit-by-exam (available at: http://registrar.lr.edu/forms), pay the $200 fee and obtain permission in advance from the dean of the college of the course and the provost. A minimum 30-day waiting period will exist between the date of application and the administration of the examination. Results from the examination will be reported to the provost and then to the university registrar. Applications must be made no later than mid-term of any semester, and no applications will be accepted later than the withdrawal date of the student’s next to last semester.

Credit-by-exam in 100-level courses must be completed by the end of the sophomore year or by the end of the first year for transfers. Additionally, the following rules apply:

  • No more than 16 hours may be taken in a student’s degree program as credit-by-exam,
  • No more than 8 hours in the major may be taken as credit-by-exam,
  • No more than 8 hours in any one semester may be taken as credit-by- exam.
  • Credits earned by credit by examination do not count as courses taken in residence.
  • Students may not earn credit-by-exam for any course already attempted at Lenoir-Rhyne.

Students who demonstrate competencies at a level consistent with that necessary to earn a grade equivalent at least to a C/2.0 in the course(s) shall receive academic credit (indicated as a CR on the transcript), but no letter grade for the course is given, and, thus, the grade point average will not be affected. A failed exam may not be repeated. A student who fails a credit-by-examination for a specific course may later enroll in that course with no penalty.

Advanced Placement

Lenoir-Rhyne University participates fully in the Advanced Placement Program, awarding placement credit for examination scores of 3, 4, or 5. The letter grade of satisfactory will be assigned to accepted advanced placement scores.

The Advanced Placement Program is administered by the Office of the Provost, the Registrar’s Office and the colleges concerned.

Scores of 3 or better on the following Advanced Placement examinations will be accepted and credit awarded for the specific Lenoir-Rhyne University courses as shown below. Scores must be mailed from the College Board to be acceptable.

 AP Exam

Exam Score Required

Hours Awarded

LR Course Awarded

Art History

3+

3

ART 341

Biology

 

3

4, 5

3

4

BIO 110

BIO 105 (with approval)

Calculus AB

3

4

MAT 165

Calculus BC

3

8

MAT 165   and

MAT 166

Chemistry

 

 

3, 4

5

 

4

 

8

CHE 103 & 103L

CHE 103 & 103L  and

CHE 104 & 104L

Computer Science A

3

3

CSC 141

English Language and Composition

3

4

ENG 131

English Literature and Composition

3

3

HUM 188

French Language and Culture

3

4, 5

3

6

FRE 110

FRE 110 and FRE 111

German Language and Culture

 

3

4,5

3

6

GER 110

GER 110 and GER 111

History - United States History

3

3

HIS 121

History - European History

3

3

HIS 102    or    HIS 230G

Music Theory

3

4

MUS 160

Physics 1: Algebra-Based

3

4

PHY 121

Physics 2: Algebra-Based

3

4

PHY 122

Psychology

3

3

PSY 100

Spanish Language and Culture

 

3

4,5

3

6

SPA 110

SPA 110 and SPA 111

Statistics

3

3

MAT 115

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Lenoir-Rhyne University accepts the standardized tests offered through the College Entrance Examinations Board’s College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Periodic review of available CLEP exams will be made by the faculty. CLEP exams are no longer offered on campus at Lenoir-Rhyne, but students may contact the College Board to find the nearest exam site.

The College Level Examination Program is administered by the Registrar’s Office, the Office of the Provost, and the colleges concerned.

Generally, scores of 50 or above are accepted for credit. Credit will be indicated by grade of “CR” assigned to accepted CLEP tests. Scores must be mailed from the College Board to be acceptable.

CLEP Subject Exam

Minimum Score Required

Hours Awarded

LR Course Awarded

Calculus

50

4

MAT 165

College Algebra

50

3

MAT 105

Financial Accounting

50

3

ACC 231

French Language: Levels 1 and 2

 

50

62

3

6

FRE 110

FRE 110 and FRE 111

German Language: Levels 1 and 2

 

50

62

3

6

GER 110

GER 110 and GER 111

History of the United States I: Early Colonization to 1877

50

3

HIS 121

History of the United States II: 1865 to Present

50

3

HIS 122

History of the United States I: Early Colonialization to 1877

50

3

HIS 121

History of the United States II: 1865 to Present

50

3

HIS 122

Information Systems

50

3

CSC 175

Introductory Psychology

50

3

PSY 100

Precalculus

50

4

MAT 129

Spanish Language: Levels 1 and 2

 

50

62

3

6

SPA 110

SPA 110 and SPA 111

Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648

50

3

HIS 101

Western Civilization II: 1648 to the Present

50

3

HIS 102

International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is a rigorous pre-university course of study that meets the needs of the highly motivated and academically gifted secondary school student. The program allows its graduates to fulfill requirements for the various international systems of education.

Lenoir-Rhyne University recognizes the value of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and the significant achievement of those students who complete the program. The IB Program is administered by the Office of the Provost, the Registrar’s Office and the colleges concerned. The university awards credit for IB work according to the following policy:

  1. Lenoir-Rhyne University will award academic credit for satisfactory IB work for students who have been awarded the IB diploma and for those who have achieved a certificate for successful completion of IB subjects.
  2. Academic credit will be awarded for grades of 4 or higher on Higher Level (HL) subjects and for grades of 5 or higher on Subsidiary Level (SL) subjects.
  3. A maximum of six credits of Lenoir-Rhyne University course work will be awarded for Higher Level subjects in which grades of 4 or higher are achieved.
  4. A maximum of three credits of Lenoir-Rhyne University course work will be awarded in Subsidiary Level subjects in which grades of 5 are achieved. A maximum of six credits will be awarded in SL courses in which a grade of 6 or 7 is achieved.
  5. Additional credit may be awarded to students in the area of their extended essay if the student has written a successful essay and has received a notation of 0+, 1+ or 2+. No credit is possible for a student who receives a notation of 1-. Determination of appropriate specific credit is made by the provost in consultation with the chairperson of the department in the area of the extended essay.
  6. A maximum of 30 credits of specific course work (as determined by the provost in consultation with appropriate college dean) will be awarded to the student who has qualified for and has been awarded the IB Diploma. Students who failed to achieve the IB Diploma but who have achieved certification in certain IB subjects will have the opportunity to receive academic credit for the subject as determined by the provost and the appropriate college dean.

Experiential Education

Many important student learning outcomes desired by Lenoir-Rhyne University are acquired in non-classroom settings. Broadly conceived, experiential education encompasses a wide range of curricular and co-curricular activities which assist students in their personal growth and development, provide opportunities for career exploration or develop work-related competencies.

Lenoir-Rhyne recognizes the following basic types of experiential learning opportunities:

Professional: Students serve in assigned responsibilities under the supervision of a professional while receiving appropriate instruction putting theory into practice, developing job-related skills and synthesizing knowledge, skills and values. Such areas include, but are not limited to, the fields of education, nursing, psychology, social work and Christian education.

Career ExplorationStudents work in a supervised placement to perform a useful service, to analyze the career possibilities inherent in such tasks and to develop employment-related skills. The educational institution provides the means for structured reflection, analysis and self-evaluation; the agency provides an evaluation of the students’ work and career potential.

Service/Personal LearningStudents undertake a program in an on- or off-campus setting that is designed to further their personal growth and development. Such experiences include, but are not limited to, field research, outdoor or wilderness education, travel/study and other areas.

Guidelines:
  1. The experiential learning activity must be associated with an academic program in a clearly defined and identifiable way and must have the advanced approval of the related academic department.
  2. Learning activities must be carefully planned and supervised. Supervision will be provided by a faculty member(s) with competence in the area of the learning activity and/or, when appropriate, by a program approved, field-based supervisor.
  3. The expected goals of the experiential learning opportunity must be clearly stated.
  4. Student performance must be carefully evaluated by faculty and other supervisors, and assigned grades shall be noted on official transcripts. Unless they are used to fulfill major requirements, such courses will normally be graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.
  5. No more than 12 credit hours in experiential learning may be counted toward the 128 credit hours graduation requirement, except in the case of major programs (e.g., student teaching, nursing) which require more than 12 hours in experiential education.
  6. Proposed additions of experiential learning courses to the curriculum must follow the regular process of endorsement by the appropriate academic college, Academic Program Committee, and Faculty Assembly. Within the general rubrics of an approved course, specific learning opportunities may vary; therefore, records of such individual student experiences will be kept on file by the supervising faculty member.
  7. No more than one credit hour will be awarded for each 35 hours of approved experiential learning.
  8. Credits may not be awarded for experiential learning opportunities that do not have prior institutional evaluation and approval.
  9. In the event that students desire academic credit for a type of experiential learning not related to currently approved experiential learning courses, they may undertake the following:
    1. solicit the cooperation and support of a faculty sponsor. Sponsorship reflects a belief in the legitimacy of the proposal and a willingness to supervise and evaluate the experience individually or in cooperation with other sponsors (e.g., campus or non-campus professionals).
    2. acquire necessary forms from the Office of the Provost and outline the goals to be achieved, procedures to be used, extent of activity to be pursued, and method of evaluation to be followed.
    3. submit the forms to the Office of the Provost for transmission to the Academic Program Committee and for its approval at least four (4) weeks prior to the beginning of the learning experience.
  10. Field experiences which currently exist as faculty-approved course offerings (e.g., student teaching, nursing) do not require Academic Program Committee approval. Students desiring such experiences follow the normal channels of registration.
  11. The preceding guidelines do not apply to traditional laboratory experiences.

Non-Credit Experiential Learning

Lenoir-Rhyne University affirms both the value and necessity of relating classroom and non-classroom learning opportunities in the quest of integrating liberal learning, vocational pursuits, and personal values. The university expects and encourages students to explore a variety of co-curricular activities as a vital aspect of their educational experience; however, students cannot expect that academic credit will be awarded for every aspect of their learning at the university. Lenoir-Rhyne does not award academic credit for participation in intercollegiate or intramural athletics, cheer leading, various student organizations and certain co-curricular activities.

The dimension of experiential education occurs in many courses offered by academic schools. Some majors include field experience and/or internships as requirements or electives. Students in consultation with faculty sponsors may devise independent studies with an experiential learning emphasis

GRADING

Grade and Grade Point Average

Grading in individual courses is the prerogative of the course instructor who will at the beginning of each term notify the students of the grading standards for each course.

At mid-term and at the end of each semester, grade reports containing all information deemed necessary are available for students via myLR online. Official academic transcripts may be withheld for failure to satisfy financial or other responsibilities on campus.

Course grades are averaged on a grade point average scale with the following values assigned to each letter grade:

A

4.0 points per semester hour

A-

3.7 points per semester hour

B+

3.3 points per semester hour

B

3.0 points per semester hour

B-

2.7 points per semester hour

C+

2.3 points per semester hour

C

2.0 points per semester hour

C-

1.7 points per semester hour

D+

1.3 points per semester hour

D

1.0 points per semester hour

D-

0.7 points per semester hour

F

0.0 points per semester hour

AU

Audit, no credit

CR

Credit given; not calculated in GPA

FX

Failing grade for violation of Academic Integrity Code; 0.0 points per semester hour

I

Incomplete, assigned due to unavoidable cause

NG

No grade required (not counting in GPA)

NR

Not reported in time for processing (not counting in GPA)

P

Pass - passing grade; not calculated in GPA

S

Satisfactory - passing grade; not calculated in GPA

U

Unsatisfactory - failing grade; not calculated in GPA

W

Withdrawal from course; not calculated in GPA

WP

Withdrawal Passing from the University; not calculated in GPA

WF

WF Withdrawal Failing from the University; calculated as “F” in GPA

 

To compute a grade point average, a student must multiply the credits for the course by point values for each grade received, total those point values and divide that total by the number of hours (graded courses) taken. An average of 4.00 would indicate the student received all A’s, 3.00 a B average, 2.00 a C average, 1.00 a D average and below .70 is failing work.

Incomplete Grades

Students may be given an incomplete grade ”I” if, because of sickness or other extreme necessity, some specific portion of their work remains unfinished, provided they are passing the course.

Incomplete grades (“I”) may be given if the student is unable to complete a course due to illness or extreme hardship. The student should have been passing the course at the time when becoming unable to complete the course in a timely manner. An “I” grade is not normally given when a student has stopped attending without notice, has never attended the course, did not complete all assignments to the point of hardship or will be required to retake the course to meet requirements.

The student must make up the missing work in the course by the following deadlines:

              Fall “I” grade must be completed by March 15 of the following spring semester.

              Spring/Summer “I” grade must be completed by October 15 of the following fall semester.

All incomplete grades must be completed by the deadline or the “I” will be automatically changed to a grade of “F” or “U.”

Students should not register for the course in which they have an incomplete grade, or the incomplete grade will be changed to an “F” immediately.

Academic Standing is based on the academic record as it stands at the end of each semester. Incomplete grades are viewed as credits not officially earned, and no changes will be made to academic standing even if the incomplete grades are completed.

Students may not graduate with an “I” grade on the transcript.

Any change to the final grade of “F” must be done within one year of the original posting of the original incomplete grade and prior to graduation. After one year or at the time of graduation, the final grade will remain an “F.”

Pass/Fail Grades

Juniors and Seniors are permitted to register for a maximum of one course in each semester on a Pass/Fail (P/F) basis, with the proviso that such courses may not satisfy requirements in a student’s major or minor or general education. Additionally no course required in designated “Honors” requirements can be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Courses graded as Pass/Fail may count towards elective credit for graduation only.  No more than 12 semester hours total may be taken on a P/F basis to count towards graduation requirements. The designation “Pass” is awarded only for work equivalent to a grade of C/2.0 or better. The university registrar shall be notified at the time of registration which courses, if any, are being taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

Students who change majors and who find they have already completed courses on an P/F basis which are required in the new major may (1) have the Pass grade converted to a grade of C/2.0, (2) retake the course for a grade, or (3) at the direction of the program, complete a substitute course.

Grade Substitution Repeats

Grade substitution repeats allow students to retake courses to attempt to earn a better grade. While all grades will be recorded on the transcript, the first grade will be removed from the grade point average calculation once the final grade of the retaking of the course is posted. The following rules apply:

  • Only courses in which the student earned a grade of C-/1.7 or less may be repeated for grade substitution.
  • Special permission must be secured from the dean of the college of the major for any repeat of a course in which the original grade earned was a C/2.0 or higher.
  • Students may repeat up to 18 hours of courses for grade forgiveness. After repeating 18 hours for grade forgiveness, all grades will count in the grade point average regardless of the number of times repeated.
  • A course substitution can only be used one time per course. While students may retake courses as many times as needed (unless expressly prohibited), only the first grade will be removed from the GPA calculation. Any subsequent grades from retaking the same course will count in the grade point average regardless of the number of times repeated.
  • The final grade earned in a course is the official grade.
  • This policy only applies to courses taken at LR and students may not transfer in a course to count as grade forgiveness of a course taken at LR.

Grade Appeals

Lenoir-Rhyne University takes seriously the concerns and academic complaints of its students. LR will provide a prompt response to all written complaints, including those challenging course grades.

A student having what they believe to be a substantive reason for a course grade appeal should, wherever possible and reasonable, attempt to discuss the problem with the instructor and reach an informal resolution.  If the student is dissatisfied with the informal resolution, is unable to reach an informal resolution, or chooses not to engage in the informal resolution process, the student should put their course grade appeal in writing (electronic or hard copy) to the college dean of the course in question no later than 30 days after the posting of final grades at the end of the relevant semester. The university reserves the right to dismiss course grade appeals that are not submitted within this time period, and any appeals made later than the mid-term of the following full semester (fall/spring) will not be considered. 

For more information on the grade appeals process, please see The Lenoir-Rhyne University Student Handbook.

Class Attendance

At Lenoir-Rhyne University students are expected to attend all scheduled class sessions, participate fully in the learning process, engage respectfully with instructors and peers and complete all course requirements. Attendance is critical to a student’s educational experience and to their learning. Thus, students are expected to attend every class meeting. Specific attendance policies vary by instructor, so students should review each course syllabus carefully. Regardless of the reason for the absence(s) (excused or unexcused), students should be aware that excessive absence from class may affect their grade and/or their ability to pass a course.

WAITING FOR THE INSTRUCTOR: Students are expected to wait for the course instructor for at least 10 minutes

Dean’s & President’s List

Dean’s List

In recognition of high academic achievement, a Dean’s List is announced each semester. The Dean’s List is composed of students with a grade point average of 3.50 to 3.89, provided no grade is below a C/2.0 and the student carried at least 12 hours of letter-graded courses. Students with incomplete grade(s) at the end of the semester are not eligible for the Dean’s List.

President’s List

In recognition of highest academic achievement, the President’s List is announced each semester. The President’s List is composed of students with a grade point average of 3.90 or better, provided no grade is below a C/2.0 and provided the student carried at least 12 hours of letter-graded courses. Students with incomplete grade(s) at the end of the semester are not eligible for the President’s List.

ACADEMIC STANDING

Satisfactory Academic Progress

In order to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress students must meet the following criteria:

  • Full-time students must pass at least nine (9) credits each regular semester.
  • Full-time students must meet minimum standards for credits earned and GPA as reflected in the following chart.
  • Full-time students must not fall below a semester GPA of 2.0 after the fourth semester.
  • Part-time students taking more than one course each regular semester must pass one-half of the credits attempted.
Semester 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Credits 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120 128 128
Earned GPA 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

Students not meeting standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress are subject to Academic Probation or Academic Suspension.

Responsibility for Satisfactory Academic Progress

The main responsibility for satisfactory academic progress rests with the students. Additionally, the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee enforces criteria for satisfactory academic progress. Faculty will administer grades at the mid-point and end of each academic semester for each student enrolled in a particular course. However, it is the responsibility of the student to ascertain their current academic standing in any class in which they are enrolled.

Student academic records and progress will not be discussed with any other person outside of faculty and staff of Lenoir-Rhyne University, including parents, unless a Student Disclosure Waiver is on file in the Registrar’s Office (see Student Disclosure Waiver below).

In addition to university requirements for satisfactory academic progress, some academic programs have additional academic requirements that students must meet in order to continue in these programs. These additional requirements supersede university requirements for continuation in these particular programs. Students not meeting these additional academic requirements may be removed from these particular programs. However, removal from a program does not necessarily mean removal from the university. As long as the university standards for satisfactory academic progress are met, a student may remain enrolled at Lenoir-Rhyne.

Part-time students are subject to the same cumulative GPA criteria as full-time students in determining Satisfactory Academic Progress and should follow all listed requirements and definitions regarding procedures for Academic Probation and Suspension. However, part-time students are not subject to cumulative hours-earned criteria as reflected in the Satisfactory Academic Progress chart.

Academic Probation and Suspension

Any student who fails to meet minimum standards for cumulative GPA, cumulative credits passed or semester credits passed, is subject to Academic Probation or Academic Suspension.

Lenoir-Rhyne University requires students to have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in order to graduate. Lenoir-Rhyne has also established minimum criteria for satisfactory academic progress based on the number of semesters a student has been enrolled, the number of attempted credit hours and the number of credit hours earned at Lenoir-Rhyne. The criteria can be found in the table above. Any student whose earned credits and cumulative average fail to meet the required criteria may be placed on Academic Probation or Suspension. Full-time students who pass less than nine credits in any semester are subject to Academic Suspension. Part-time students who take more than one course in a semester and who pass less than one-half of the semester hours attempted are subject to Academic Suspension.

Academic Probation

Full-time students who are not in compliance with Satisfactory Academic Progress standards listed above are subject to Academic Probation. Students placed on Academic Probation are expected to comply with all terms of Academic Probation. Students placed on Academic Probation will be monitored by BEAR Central and should work closely with this office as well as their faculty advisor to ensure that they comply with all terms of their probation.

Students on probation who fail to meet criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress are subject to one additional semester of Academic Probation or Academic Suspension. Determination of continued Academic Probation or Academic Suspension is the responsibility of the Faculty Committee for Admissions and Academic Standing.

Students on Academic Probation are permitted to continue participating in NCAA athletic activities, University Club Sports, Intramural activities and other university clubs and organizations unless a specific organization has a written policy stating otherwise (e.g., Honor’s Academy, Lineberger Fellows) Students placed on Academic Probation may not appeal the decision.

Academic Suspension

Full-time students who fail to meet criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress and/or the terms of their Academic Probation are subject to Academic Suspension. Academic Suspension requires that the student must not be enrolled at Lenoir-Rhyne University for one full Academic semester (not including summer).

Students placed on Academic Suspension may be subject to loss or reduction of Financial Aid (see Satisfactory Academic Progress and Financial Aid).

A full-time student facing Academic Suspension at the conclusion of the spring semester may be allowed to enroll in summer school at Lenoir-Rhyne. If so, the student will be allowed to enroll in up to nine credits of summer school. If that student meets the criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress by the conclusion of the second summer session, the student will be permitted to register for the fall semester but will remain on Academic Probation for the following semester. If the criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress are not met but the student shows signs of significant academic improvement, the committee may permit the student to continue for one additional semester on Academic Probation. If the student chooses not to attend summer school the student will be subject to the punitive effects of Academic Suspension. Summer credits, both at Lenoir-Rhyne and outside institutions, must be preapproved by the Registrar’s Office.

A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne after a one-semester period of Academic Suspension must notify BEAR Central for readmission criteria and procedures. A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne after a two-semester period of Academic Suspension must apply for re-admission to Lenoir-Rhyne through the Office of Admission.

Students continuing study after Academic Suspension will continue on Academic Probation until minimum standards under the prescribed Satisfactory Academic Progress chart are obtained and are subject to all of the terms of Academic Probation.

Full-time students who have been on Academic Suspension and are subsequently permitted to continue study but continue to perform below the criteria for Satisfactory Academic Progress may be dismissed.

Appeal of Academic Standing Action

The institution recognizes that exceptional circumstances occasionally require consideration. The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee reserves the right to place any student on Academic Probation, Academic Suspension, or Expulsion at the conclusion of any semester. The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee further reserves the right to consider exceptional circumstances in decisions concerning removal of Academic Suspension status. In addition, students must appeal any loss or reduction of financial aid due to their academic status separately from their appeal of Academic Suspension.

Notification concerning the appeal process will be distributed to the student via their Lenoir-Rhyne email address and their permanent address of record following the decision of the committee to place the student on Academic Suspension. Students should read all available materials carefully.

Students placed on Academic Probation may not appeal the decision.

The details of the appeal process and deadline for submitting appeals of Academic Suspension are indicated in the letter of Academic Suspension sent to the students Lenoir-Rhyne email address and the permanent address of record. Appeals received after the deadline will not be reviewed by the committee. The decision following the appeal process is final.

Before any campus representative may talk to a student’s parent or guardian, the Student Disclosure waiver must be signed by the student and be on file in the Registrar’s Office. The student must sign and date the waiver and send a copy, either by fax (828-328-7368) or mail (Office of the Registrar, Lenoir-Rhyne University, Box 7277, Hickory, NC, 28603) before the deadline for the receipt of appeals. Copies of the Student Disclosure waiver are available in the Registrar’s Office and online. Students must complete the appeals process related to suspension as outlined in the letter of Academic Suspension. Students should keep a copy of all responses regarding the appeal that they submit. Appeals of Academic Suspension must be submitted:

By email: Student.Success@lr.edu
Attention: Director BEAR Central

Notification of Committee Decision Regarding Appeal of Academic Suspension

Students who appeal their Academic Suspension will be notified by email and by mail of the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee’s decision regarding their appeal. Email notification will be sent within 24 hours of the committee meeting and the official letter will be sent within 36 hours of committee meeting. The date for committee appeal decisions is included in the original letter of Academic Suspension..

Results of Appealing Academic Suspension

The Admissions and Academic Standing Committee may either uphold the original suspension or rescind the suspension.

If the original suspension is rescinded, the student may continue as a student at Lenoir-Rhyne on Academic Probation during the following academic semester subject to all terms of Academic Probation (see Academic Probation). Students who have their Academic Suspension rescinded must also register for classes. They will not be allowed to register until they meet with a representative of the Office of the Provost to review the terms of Academic Probation.

If the suspension is upheld, the student must sit out the following academic semester at Lenoir-Rhyne. A full-time student facing Academic Suspension at the conclusion of the spring semester may be allowed to enroll in summer school at Lenoir-Rhyne. If so, the student will be allowed to enroll in up to nine credits in summer school. If that student attains the needed GPA by the conclusion of the second session and/or shows signs of significant academic improvement, the student may be permitted to register for fall semester courses at the discretion of the committee. If the necessary GPA and/or significant progress is not obtained, or if the student chooses not to attend summer school at Lenoir-Rhyne, the student may not attend fall semester. Summer school credits must be pre-approved by the Registrar.

Application for Readmission Following Suspension or Rescinding of Original Suspension

A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne University after a one-semester period of Academic Suspension must notify BEAR Central for readmission criteria and procedures. Continuation of study is allowed only if all conditions of suspension have been met as determined by the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee. A student who wishes to continue study at Lenoir-Rhyne after a two-semester period of Academic Suspension must apply for re-admission to Lenoir-Rhyne University through the Office of Admissions. Readmission determinations are the responsibility of the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee. Students who are expelled may not apply for readmission.

While on suspension, students are strongly encouraged to enroll in college-level courses at an accredited institution to show intent for progress to the committee. These courses must be approved by the university registrar prior to enrollment. Transcripts for work taken during the period of suspension must be included with the Application for Readmission. Approval of transfer work does not guarantee readmission to the university.

Students will be notified whether their applications for readmission have been approved or denied by a representative of the Office of Admission. If the application for readmission is approved, the student may enroll in classes at Lenoir-Rhyne on Academic Probation (see Academic Probation above). If the application for readmission is denied, students will not be allowed to enroll in courses for the following semester at Lenoir-Rhyne.

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Financial Aid

Students must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward a degree to remain eligible for federal, state and some forms of institutional financial aid. Please note that SAP standards for financial aid are different from the SAP standards reviewed by the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee; students are responsible for understanding and adhering to both policies.

In order to maintain aid eligibility, students must complete and pass 66.7% of courses for which they receive aid, keeping them on pace to complete their program within 150% of the maximum timeframe required. Additionally, students must maintain a cumulative GPA consistent with the below chart.

Semesters Completed*

1

2

3

4 or more

Cumulative GPA Required

1.8

1.8

1.9

2.0

*Semesters completed include coursework completed at other institutions as well as summer coursework

Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed each semester by the Office of Financial Aid and students who fail to meet the minimum standards will receive a Financial Aid Warning (notice to the student that continuing to achieve below satisfactory academic progress will result in a suspension of their aid). Students who fail to meet the minimum standards for a second consecutive semester will have their aid suspended. Students whose aid has been suspended have the option to appeal this decision by following the instructions given in their notification letter. Appealing this decision will result in:

  • Denial: student must return to minimum SAP standards before receiving further aid
  • Probation: student can receive aid for one semester while attempting to return to minimum SAP standards
  • Academic Plan: student can receive aid contingent upon the successful drafting and completion of an academic plan, built in conjunction with their advisor and approved by the Office of Financial Aid, which is designed to get the student back to minimum SAP standards in a reasonable timeframe.

    Students must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward a degree to remain eligible for federal, state and some forms of institutional financial aid. Please note that SAP standards for financial aid are different from the SAP standards reviewed by the Admissions and Academic Standing Committee; students are responsible for understanding and adhering to both policies.

    In order to maintain aid eligibility, students must complete and pass 66.7% of courses for which they receive aid, keeping them on pace to complete their program within 150% of the maximum timeframe required. Additionally, students must maintain a cumulative GPA consistent with the below chart.

    Semesters Completed*

    1

    2

    3

    4 or more

    Cumulative GPA Required

    1.8

    1.8

    1.9

    2.0

    *Semesters completed include coursework completed at other institutions as well as summer coursework

    Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed each semester by the Office of Financial Aid and students who fail to meet the minimum standards will receive a Financial Aid Warning (notice to the student that continuing to achieve below satisfactory academic progress will result in a suspension of their aid). Students who fail to meet the minimum standards for a second consecutive semester will have their aid suspended. Students whose aid has been suspended have the option to appeal this decision by following the instructions given in their notification letter. Appealing this decision will result in:

  • Denial: student must return to minimum SAP standards before receiving further aid
  • Probation: student can receive aid for one semester while attempting to return to minimum SAP standards
  • Academic Plan: student can receive aid contingent upon the successful drafting and completion of an academic plan, built in conjunction with their advisor and approved by the Office of Financial Aid, which is designed to get the student back to minimum SAP standards in a reasonable timeframe.

Appealing a Financial Aid Suspension

Students wishing to appeal a financial aid suspension may do so based on injury or illness, the death of a relative or other special circumstances. When appealing, students should describe the basis for their appeal in detail and provide supporting documentation (doctor’s note, death certificate, etc.). The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow them to make satisfactory progress at the next evaluation. Students failing to meet the pace requirement should document a cumulative set of reasons that have impacted their ability to maintain proper pace and how they specifically will avoid these issues in future terms

Repeated and Incomplete Coursework, Withdrawals, and Transfer Credit

Students may receive financial aid to repeat failed coursework as many times as needed until they have earned a passing grade. Students may only receive aid to repeat passed coursework one time. Please refer to the university policy regarding repeated coursework to better understand how the GPA is impacted.

Incomplete coursework will be factored into the semester review of SAP as applicable. The financial aid office will consider whether an incomplete, if failed, could drop a student below SAP standards and will notify the student accordingly. The student will have the opportunity to appeal the decision but will also be reviewed again when the coursework has been completed. If the incomplete coursework does not pose a threat to the student’s maintaining SAP standards, that coursework will be considered reviewed for the semester, and the final grade will be considered as appropriate in future SAP reviews.

Courses from which a student withdraws are counted towards a student’s pace, but not towards GPA requirements. Likewise, transfer credits are counted toward pace but are not factored into a student’s GPA.

GRADUATION

Graduation Application

During spring semester of the junior year, the student must complete an application for degree form in the Registrar’s Office or online. This form requests information needed to conduct the degree audit and print the diploma. Failure to complete this form could mean a delay in receiving the diploma and omission from commencement exercises.

Graduation Requirements

Residency

To graduate from Lenoir-Rhyne University, students must complete a minimum of 128 credits with at least 25% of the credit hours earned at Lenoir-Rhyne. Students transferring from two-year institutions must complete a minimum of 60 credits, including at least one-half of the major requirements, at Lenoir-Rhyne. All students must complete a minimum of 12 hours in the major and 6 hours in a minor at Lenoir-Rhyne.

“In residence” courses include all regularly taken courses registered through Lenoir-Rhyne. The following types of credit DO NOT COUNT as in residence: AP, IB, or CLEP; credit by exam; transfer credit; military credit; experiential education.

Grade Point Average

All students must earn a minimum major, minor (if earning) and cumulative grade point averages of 2.00. The major grade point average includes all courses taken in the major field and all courses required for the major even though the courses may be in another field. All completed attempts of all of the previously described courses are counted unless specifically excluded by grade repeat policy.

Some majors/minors require higher GPAs for graduation.

All Incomplete grades must be removed from the transcript.

Additional Requirements

  • All course and other requirements of the general education, major(s) and any minor(s) must also be met.
  • Some programs require students to take a comprehensive assessment examination in their major field of study. This examination will be taken in the students’ final semester and will be administered by the programs.

Commencement Attendance

Commencement ceremonies are held in May of each year for all students who graduate at any time in the academic year. Please see the academic calendar for spring semester for the date of commencement.   

Students participating in the ceremony are required to have a cap and gown. Information about ordering graduation items, including caps, gowns, and announcements, can be found in the Commencement Handbook on the LR website (https://www.lr.edu/public-events/commencement) or at the annual Grad Fair in spring semester.

Graduation and Latin Honors

The graduating senior who earns the highest grade point average receives First Honors; the senior who earns the next highest grade point average receives Second Honors. In each case, the grade point average cannot be lower than 3.40.

A senior with a grade point average from 3.40 to 3.59 will graduate cum laude; with a grade-point average from 3.60 to 3.89 will graduate magna cum laude; with a grade point average of 3.90 or more, summa cum laude.