Dec 08, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2022-2023

Special Programs and Opportunities



Alumni Advantage Program

University alumni who complete their Bachelor’s degree (or another graduate degree at an earlier time) at Lenoir-Rhyne University and who meet the following criteria are eligible for tuition discount on all graduate courses taken toward satisfying graduate degree requirements at Lenoir-Rhyne University in specified programs. These discounts are applicable only toward courses that are taken after completion of one’s undergraduate degree and only on graduate hours that are taken toward completion of the particular degree requirements. LR reserves the right not to offer discounted credits in particular programs and certain programs do not offer the Alumni Advantage program.

Undergraduate Alumni

The discount rate will be 15% on all LR graduate hours taken toward degree completion if:

  • The student successfully completes at least 64 undergraduate credit hours at LR;
  • The student successfully completes all requirements for and graduates with an undergraduate degree from LR; and
  • The student meets program admissions requirements and is accepted into one of the University’s graduate programs as a degree-seeking student.

The discount rate will be 20% if:

  • The student successfully completes at least 96 undergraduate credit hours at LR;
  • The student successfully completes all requirements for and graduates with an undergraduate degree from LR; and
  • The student meets program admissions requirements and is accepted into one of the University’s graduate programs as a degree-seeking student.

Graduate Alumni

LR alumni from previous graduate level studies are also eligible for course discounts of 15% on all LR graduate hours taken toward degree completion if they return for another graduate degree that participates in the Alumni Advantage program.

To receive the discount, the student must be accepted as a degree-seeking student and enrolled into the particular approved graduate program as outlined in the University’s admissions policies and procedures. This offer does not imply or ensure admissions into any of the University’s graduate programs. The discount only applies to hours taken toward meeting the requirements of the degree. This discount may not be combined with any other graduate discounts or scholarships furnished by Lenoir-Rhyne University. The discount is applicable to any participating graduate program on any of the University’s three campuses. This discount policy does not apply to post-baccalaureate courses that are not a part of a graduate degree, such as postbaccalaureate teacher licensure or the Dietetics Internship program. It does not apply to any second undergraduate degree hours. As Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary is now a part of Lenoir-Rhyne University, all returning LTSS alumni are also eligible for this offer.

Lenoir-Rhyne University reserves the right to discontinue this discount opportunity at any time. However, if the University decides to end the offer, current students under the plan will receive the discount for a reasonable amount of time to allow them the opportunity to complete their current program.

Bridges to Dreams Program

Lenoir-Rhyne University’s “Bridges to Dreams” program is designed to assist current LR undergraduate students toward additional completion of a graduate degree. Through dual enrollment in their senior year, qualified LR undergraduates may begin their graduate courses while still completing their undergraduate degrees. Provided they meet the academic criteria for admission and are accepted into the Bridges program, LR students may enroll in up to 12 credit hours of graduate-level work as part of their senior year, which may be used to meet undergraduate graduation requirements and/or begin coursework in their graduate studies at LR. The number of hours that may be taken will vary by graduate program but may not exceed 12 credit hours. Note that not all graduate programs may participate in the Bridges program - see participation list below.

Students approved to participate in the Bridges program are considered Provisionally Admitted to their respective graduate program of interest and their academic performance will be reviewed after each semester to ensure satisfactory academic progress. Upon the successful completion of their undergraduate degree and provided the minimum academic performance criteria is met for each course within the Bridges program, students will receive formal admission into their selected graduate program of study. Meeting these criteria allows entry to their graduate program without the standard formal application requirements otherwise required of graduate program applicants.

In taking graduate courses during their final semester(s) as an undergraduate, students participating in the Bridges program are able to save the costs of these credits at the graduate level. Additionally, students successfully completing their undergraduate degree at LR and who also meet the required criteria will be eligible for the “Alumni Advantage” program, which provides a tuition discount on all remaining graduate courses taken toward satisfying graduate degree completion at Lenoir-Rhyne University in approved specified programs. (See Alumni Advantage Section for more information and minimum requirements.)

The first students admitted to an Open Bridge program are expected to be implemented in the spring semester of 2015 with the Articulated Bridge programs to be implemented in the fall semester of 2015. (See program definitions below.) Students will be admitted to the Bridges Program in either the Fall or Spring semester only; however, once admitted to an approved program, students may enroll in courses available in any term. Summer courses will be charged at the standard rate per credit hour and are not subject to any University discount program.

Special Note: Students participating in an approved Bridge program must satisfy the minimum required hours for the respective graduate program and must earn a minimum of 150 cumulative credit hours, both undergraduate and graduate, in order to successfully complete both degree programs. Students who wish to complete graduate programs which require less than 34 credit hours must pay particular attention to this requirement.

Bridge Program Designations and Participation

Open Bridge

Students accepted to an Open Bridge program are on track to successfully complete their undergraduate degree requirements and have space available in their academic schedules to accommodate the necessary demands of graduate-level courses. Courses completed as a part of an Open Bridge program are factored as general electives toward their undergraduate curriculum and will factor in the student’s cumulative GPA. Once a student officially matriculates into a graduate program, courses taken as part of a Bridge program will appear as ‘transfer’ credit on the student’s graduate transcript and will not be factored in the graduate program GPA.

If a student desires for credit earned as part of an Open Bridge program to also serve as a course substitute for an undergraduate degree requirement, a Course Substitution form must be completed, filed and approved by the University Registrar prior to enrolling in the course. Students who will have earned 92 credit hours by the end of their semester of application (a minimum of 64 credits earned at Lenoir-Rhyne) are eligible to apply for an Open Bridge program. Applications must be completed by the deadline indicated below for consideration - late applicants will not be considered until the following fall or spring semester.

Graduate Programs Participating in an Open Bridge Program:

Business Administration (MBA) Online Teaching & Instructional Design (MS)
Community College Administration (MA) Public Health (MPH)
Counseling - Clinical Mental Health (MA) Sustainability Studies (MS)
Counseling - School (MA) Teaching (MA)
Exercise Science (MS) University Leadership (MA)
Human Services (MA) Writing (MA)
Leadership (MA)  

Articulated Bridge

Articulated Bridge programs differ from Open Bridges in that these are unique transition programs which allow students to dually earn credit toward both their undergraduate major curriculum as well as graduate-level credit towards a specific graduate program.

Courses completed as part of an Articulated Bridge program will serve as course substitutes towards their undergraduate curriculum and grades earned in these courses will be factored in both the major and cumulative GPAs. Once a student officially matriculates into a graduate program, courses taken as part of a Bridge program will appear as ‘transfer’ credit on the student’s graduate transcript and will not be factored in the graduate program GPA. Since these programs are ‘pre-approved’ by the University, a separate course substitution form is not necessary.

Students who will have earned 92 credit hours (a minimum of 64 credits earned at Lenoir-Rhyne) by the end of their semester of application are eligible to apply for an Articulated Bridge program. Applications must be completed by the deadline indicated below for consideration - late applicants will not be considered.

Graduate Programs Participating in Articulated Bridge Programs:

Accounting to MBA Finance to MBA
Community Health to MPH Human & Community Service to MA Counseling (both programs)
Elementary/Middle Grades Education to MS OTID Human & Community Service to MA Human Services
English to MA Liberal Studies International Business to MBA
English to MA Writing Management to MBA
Entrepreneurship to MBA Marketing to MBA
Environmental Studies to MS Sustainability Studies Psychology to MA Counseling (both programs)

*Qualified students seeking entry to the Master of Arts: Teaching program for the sake of Secondary Education may participate in one of the following approved articulated BRIDGE programs. Note that entry requirements may vary by program and are at the discretion of the School of Education. Please see the School of Education section of the Catalog for more detailed information.

  • English to MAT*
  • Exercise Science (Health & PE) to MAT*
  • History to MAT*
  • Mathematics to MAT*
  • Music to MAT*
  • Natural Sciences to MAT*
  • Spanish to MAT*

General Admission Requirements to the Bridges Program

A candidate for admission to the Bridges to Dreams program at Lenoir-Rhyne University must:

  1. Be an LR student in good standing on all accounts (i.e. academic, judicial, financial) who will have earned at least 92 credit hours by the end of the semester in which s/he is applying to the program. (Note that a minimum of 64 of the 92 credit hours must have been earned at Lenoir-Rhyne University and excludes AP, IB, or credits earned by exam);
  2. Intend to graduate with an undergraduate degree from LR and file (or have filed) an official Application for Degree with the Registrar’s Office;
  3. Possess a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or above on all LR work to date, an overall 3.25 on all college-level work at LR or elsewhere, and (if relevant) a 3.25 in undergraduate work in the discipline in which s/he seeks graduate admissions; and
  4. It is important to note that some programs participating in the Bridges program may require additional admission requirements. These are listed with the Bridge curriculum information below.

A student may apply for the Bridges program in either the fall or spring term if the three criteria above are met. Complete applications include, at minimum, the following materials and should be submitted to the Office of Enrollment Management:

  1. Completed application form for the Bridges to Dreams program
  2. Transcripts of all undergraduate credits to date (if the University does not already possess any transcripts, it is the student’s responsibility to submit these additional documents);
  3. Reference from academic advisor or another other undergraduate faculty member capable of providing a thorough assessment of academic capabilities; and,
  4. On occasion, the University may request additional materials prior to determining admission into the program.

Note that the standard enrollment deposit for graduate admissions will be waived for students admitted to the Bridges program.

Please see Bridges to Dreams website for more information and application deadlines: http://www.lr.edu/academics/opportunities-for-exceptional-students/bridges-to-dreams.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements - Bridges Program

Students accepted in the Bridges to Dreams program may take graduate-level courses in their approved program as outline above. Continuation in the program requires successful completion of these courses each term. Students are expected to make at least a ‘B-’ in all graduate-level (500 level or above) classes. The Registrar will assess the grades of all Bridges students at the end of each semester. Failure to meet this requirement in any graduate class constitutes automatic grounds for dismissal from the Bridges program at the end of the particular semester.

Students may appeal dismissal through the University’s Admissions and Academic Standing Committee. However, reversal of dismissal by appeal will be rare. Dismissal from the Bridges program does not necessarily determine a student’s academic status of Academic Probation or Suspension, nor does it preclude the possibility of successful application for admission into an LR graduate program at a later time by traditional admissions procedures. If a student dismissed from the Bridges program achieves admission later through the traditional process, any credits completed during the Bridges program will be assessed by the graduate program in a manner similar to assessment of transfer hours.

Each graduate program may establish different standards for satisfying the probationary admissions period. Similarly, each program will furnish the courses that may be taken during one’s senior year as well as the maximum number of hours available to be completed in the Bridges program.

Graduate coursework completed during the Bridges program with a grade of ‘B-’ or better will be transferred to meet specific program requirements in the graduate program. However, these credit hours will not be calculated in the ongoing determination of the student’s cumulative grade point average after full admission in the graduate program.

Open Bridge Program Information

  

Articulated Bridge Program Information

  

Broyhill Center

The Broyhill Center for Business Leadership was created by a grant from the Broyhill Family Foundation in Lenoir, NC, to:

  1. Encourage greater understanding of the workings of the American economic system, the values of private enterprise, and business leadership in a free society.
  2. Develop the business, economic and leadership skills of future and current business persons.
  3. Stimulate a values-centered study of business leadership and economic issues.

To accomplish these purposes, the Institute engages in a variety of activities directed at both the University and the community. The Institute develops and supports forums, lectures, and seminars for the University and the Catawba Valley area. Each year the Institute, in cooperation with the Dean of Students, sponsors the Broyhill Leadership Program. The Program provides individual and group activities designed to develop and strengthen the leadership skills and attitudes of an invited group of Lenoir-Rhyne University sophomores. Leadership development grants support both faculty and student participation in a variety of conferences and seminars including an annual international travel course. The Institute provides support for curriculum development in the business administration, economics and other academic departments as well as program support for Phi Beta Lambda, the university business fraternity and Omicron Delta Epsilon, the Economics Honorary Society.

Further information on the program for the Institute may be obtained from the Director at 828-328-7933.

Engaged Scholars Program

The Engaged Scholars Program promotes undergraduate students’ participation in forms of academic development, active learning, and leadership development that extend beyond the traditional classroom. An Engaged Scholar is recognized for achieving specified levels of attainment over a series of specific learning activities–some curricular and some co-curricular–that substantially involves her/him in serious experiential learning designed to promote greater self-ownership and personal understanding of her/his learning.

As members of the Engaged Scholars Program, students complete a series of curricular and co-curricular experiences with specified levels of attainment accompanying reflective assessments of their activities. These experiences are drawn from the following categories:

  • Independent Research, with Presentation or Publication
  • Independent Creative Project, with Performance, Presentation, or Publication
  • Service Learning
  • Internship
  • Study Abroad
  • Off-Campus Community Learning and/or Research
  • Peer Tutoring
  • Co-Curricular Activity
  • Co-Curricular Leadership
  • Leadership Development
  • Career Preparation

In addition to successfully completing the activities, the program requires ongoing reflection and seminar experiences to enable students to develop habits of lifelong learning outside the classroom and to assume significant responsibility for meeting their educational goals.

To achieve the status of Engaged Scholar, a student must satisfy at least six (6) of the eleven (11) categories. Specific expectations for activities in each category are outlined below. Students may not use the same learning experience to satisfy more than one category. (Note that in a limited number of cases in which particular courses are graded “Pass/Fail,” the grade of “Pass” satisfies the ‘B-” or above requirement.)

Independent Research Accompanied by a Campus or Community Presentation or Publication:

Develop, complete, and present one’s own independent research. The presentation should be at a University sanctioned forum for student research, a regional/national conference, or a general campus convocation event. The publication must be a refereed (or similarly reviewed) article/essay.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Validation by course (or sponsoring) instructor of successful completion of the independent research project, accompanied by evidence of public presentation or publication, and verification by ESP Director and Committee.

Independent Creative Project Accompanied by a Campus/Community Performance, Presentation, or Publication:

Develop, complete and present one’s own creative project. The presentation should be at a University sanctioned forum for student research or creative expression, a regional/national conference, or a general campus convocation event. The publication must be a refereed publication. This creative project may include a recital, exhibit, or performance.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Validation by course (or sponsoring) instructor of successful completion of the independent creative project, accompanied by evidence of public presentation, performance, or publication, and verification by ESP Director and Committee.

Service Learning:

Satisfy requirements in a designated service-learning class, or a service-learning project that meets designation criteria within a non-designated course. A “service-learning course” means: significant on-site community involvement intentionally linked to the course content; preparation and reflection on the service experience; the service is for the purpose of community engagement and learning, not primarily for the development of personal or job-related skills; and, the experience is mutually beneficial to community partners and students.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Completion of a “Service Learning” designated course with a grade of ‘B-’ or better, or
  • Validation by course instructor of successful completion of a significant service learning project within a non-designated course and verification by ESP Director and Committee.

Internship:

Satisfy requirements for an internship for at least three (3) credit hours (most likely within the student’s respective major or minor).

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Completion of an Internship course or courses totaling at least three credit hours with grade/grades of ‘B-’ or better.

Study Abroad:

Participate in a University-sanctioned study abroad experience outside the United States.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Completion of Study Abroad course or courses totaling at least three credit hours with grade/grades of ‘B-’ or better, or
  • Validation by instructor or staff member responsible for the trip of successful completion of a significant study abroad experience encompassing at least one week abroad in a planned and University sanctioned program, with verification by ESP Director and Committee.

Off-Campus Community Learning and/or Research:

Satisfy requirements for an off-campus experience for credit, in which the student participates in learning activities in the community (away from the University) over an extended period of time, with a substantial experiential component, e.g., Washington Program; North Carolina Mock Legislature, Community research embedded in a course.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Successful contribution to a significant community research project within a course requiring at least 30 hours of community engagement, as validated by the instructor of record or sponsoring staff member, and verified by the ESP Director and Committee, or
  • Successful completion of a study away experience carrying at least three (3) credit hours with grade/grades of “B-” or better.

Peer Tutoring:

Successfully serve a term-long service as a peer tutor in a University course for academic credit or complete at least 40 hours verified as a University supported student tutor.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Completion of a Peer Tutoring course within an academic program for at least 2 credit hours with a grade of “B-” or above, or
  • Completion of at least 40 hours of tutoring service through the University’s Learning Commons program, as validated by the Office of Student Life and verified by the ESP Director and Committee.

Co-Curricular Activity:

Contribute a substantial year-long commitment to a university-sponsored co-curricular activity or program, such as the debate team, literary journal, the student newspaper, choir, a music ensemble, Model UN, etc….

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Completion of corresponding coursework related to the activity for at least 2 credit hours with a grade of “B-” or above, or
  • Contribution of at least 40 hours to the specific approved activity, as validated by the appropriate faculty or staff advisor or instructor, and verified by the ESP Director and Committee.

Co-Curricular Leadership:

Fulfill a student leadership role through an elected or appointed position in one of the following ways: 1) a recognized student organization; 2) campus publication or medium; 3.) a significant campus project or program.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Service in an established student organizational leadership position in a recognized student organization for at least one academic year, and
  • Completion of a short (1-2 pages) essay describing one’s leadership activities that demonstrates adequate fulfillment of leadership responsibilities to the organization’s advisor/sponsor (or the Office of Student Life, as appropriate), and
  • Successful participation in LR’s annual Leadership Workshop/Conference, and
  • Validation by the organization’s faculty or staff advisor/sponsor that adequate leadership development occurred through these activities, verified by the ESP Director and Committee.

Leadership Development:

Successfully complete a designated leadership program, serve in a University leadership position designed for students, or equivalent.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Service as a University Resident Assistant for at least one academic year, as validated by the Office of Student Life and verified by the ESP Director and Committee, or
  • Successful completion of the responsibilities of an FYE Course Assistant for at least one academic year, or
  • Successful completion of a Broyhill Institute Leadership program, as validated by the Broyhill Institute Director, and (in any of the three options)
  • Verification by the ESP Director and Committee.

Career Preparation:

Successfully engage in career development activities that encourage self-awareness, career exploration, graduate school and/or employment preparation.

Verification/validation of satisfying this category:

  • Successful completion of the Life and Career Planning class (LRC 410) with a “B-” or better, and
  • Participation in an etiquette luncheon or networking event as validated by the Career Center Director and verified by the ESP Director and Committee, and
  • Attendance of a University sponsored career fair as validated by the Career Center Director and verified by the ESP Director and Committee.

Upon completion of each experience, the Engaged Scholar crafts a short (600-1000 words) reflective essay regarding the particular activity. These essays will become a part of each student’s portfolio. These essays are expected to be of high quality and must demonstrate the value of the specific learning experience. A category is satisfied when (and only when) both the experience has been successfully fulfilled and the reflective essay is submitted and determined by the ESP seminar instructor to have met necessary standards. The Director and the ESP Committee are charged to develop the necessary specific rubrics defining the standards required to satisfy each category

In her/his senior year, drawing upon this portfolio of essays and the learning experiences, the Engaged Scholar student designs and submits a longer, more general essay (2000-2500 words) examining the benefits and lessons learned from these special activities as they relate to her/his growth as an undergraduate student. In her/his last full semester, the student defends her/his portfolio before the Engaged Scholars Committee (or its designate) to determine whether the student will receive the distinction of graduating as a “University Engaged Scholar.” Such determination of distinction will be evaluated based upon satisfaction of all program requirements, the quality of contribution in the experiences completed by the student, the quality of their reflections upon these experiences, and the student’s effectiveness of demonstrating growth through these activities and reflections. Such distinction is recognized at commencement and the student will receive additional certification and recognition for the achievement.

Eligibility and Continuation in the Program

Prospective students seeking admission to Lenoir-Rhyne University as First-Year students may concurrently apply for admission into the Engaged Scholars Program. If accepted, they become a part of the entering cohort class who matriculate in the ESP during their years at LR, as long as they maintain all requirements for continuation in the program. Students who do not join the ESP cohort during their first fall semester may apply for the program for entry in their first spring semester. The ESP Director and Committee will review these late applications in the fall semester and determine which students will be accepted, based upon the quality of the application and space in the cohort. After this point, current students will not be eligible to enter the ESP. (Successful completion of ESP 100  is waived as a program requirement for students entering in the spring term.) Transfer students with more than 18 hours of credits upon entry to LR (post-high school graduation) are not eligible for the ESP. ESP students in good standing receive a scholarship of $1,000 each fall and spring semester they are in the program and carry full-time student status (up to eight total semesters).

Continuation in the ESP requires that students meet all requirements semester-to-semester. Each semester, ESP students must successfully complete a 0-credit cohort seminar (ESP 100 /ESP 101 -ESP 400 /ESP 401 ). Additionally, after the first year of the cohort, students must maintain a 2.90 G.P.A. in order to remain in the program. Failure to successfully complete an ESP seminar in a given semester removes the student’s ESP scholarship for the upcoming semester. Failure to meet this expectation for two consecutive semesters is grounds for dismissal from the program. Any student whose G.P.A. falls below 2.90 at the end of a semester, beginning with the fall of the second year will be placed on probationary status in the program; s/he will have one full semester to raise her/his G.P.A. above the 2.90 threshold. Failure to achieve this outcome constitutes grounds for dismissal from the Engaged Scholars Program and loss of ESP scholarship.

A student who is dismissed from the ESP may appeal this outcome if s/he believes there are exceptional and unavoidable factors that led to these circumstances. Appeals of dismissal from the program are reviewed by the ESP Director and Committee. Reinstatement into the program is rare.

Students who successfully complete all requirements of the ESP will be recognized at their commencement as a “University Engaged Scholar.” Recognition through other media will be furnished as opportunities present themselves. To achieve this honor, the student must:

  • Maintain and graduate with a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 2.90 on all coursework taken at LR;
  • Manifest upstanding moral and ethical character without violation of academic integrity or student conduct policies;
  • Successfully complete all eight of the ESP Seminars (ESP 100 -ESP 401 );
  • Successfully complete at least six of the ESP categories of experience, with accompanying reflective essays; and
  • Develop, present, and defend successfully her/his final portfolio before the ESP Director and Committee.

 Courses and Program Time Table

Admission into the Program:

The Office of Admissions includes in its admissions materials access to prospective students to apply for initial entry into the ESP. Incoming students who apply for ESP will be reviewed by the Admissions staff and the ESP Director and Committee, based upon the criteria they mutually develop. Students accepted into the program will be offered a $1,000 ESP Scholarship per semester as part of their admissions package. (Cromer and Lineberger Scholars may not receive these additional scholarship funds but they may participate in the program if approved for admission.)

Students who wish to apply for the ESP during their first-year, fall semester will complete a similar application to the program, which will be reviewed by the ESP Director and Committee. Students accepted through this process will begin to receive the ESP Scholarship in their spring semester.

The ESP Director will confer with the University Registrar at the end of each semester to determine which students, in any, have not met the necessary requisites for continuation in the program. Students who fail to meet these requirements will be informed of this outcome (including loss of scholarship) by the ESP Director, in consultation with the Office of Financial Aid.

Institute for Faith and Learning

The Lenoir-Rhyne Institute for Faith and Learning was created in 2011 as an outgrowth of the strategic plan of LR and the findings of the Lenoir-Rhyne Task Force for the Future. Specifically the goal of the Institute for Faith & Learning is to work in partnership with Hickory churches and other religious agencies and organizations to provide programming (primarily guest speakers and community classes) that meets the needs of laity, clergy, and other religious leaders in Hickory. The Institute endeavors to provide programming that will contribute to and enrich “a culture of the intellect” that is theologically based. Its programs are directed at people of all faith traditions.

Further information on the Institute’s activities may be obtained from its Director at 828-328-7184.

The Honors Program

  

Lineberger Center

The Lineberger Center for Cultural and Educational Renewal was created through a generous gift of the Lineberger Foundation in Belmont, NC, to:

  1. Affirm the existence of a moral order and the renewal of that sensitivity in ourselves and our society;
  2. Promote the study of values and their importance to us and our society;
  3. Develop a capacity for making well-ordered, ethical judgments;
  4. Instill the means of making critical choices through patterns of inquiry and habits of thought;
  5. Stimulate and promote challenge, the courage to meet it, and the skills to deal with it creatively.

To accomplish these purposes, the Center engages in a wide array of activities designed for both the campus and the community. The Center supports and contributes to the University general education program; sponsors seminars, conferences and retreats on a variety of topics; sponsors Great Books sections locally; hosts the Hickory Humanities Forum; and seeks to promote integrative, interdisciplinary inquiry. Further information on the Center’s programs for this year may be obtained from its Director at 828-328-7077.

Lineberger Fellows

The Lineberger Fellows program is designed to recognize, support and celebrate the many achievements of highly motivated and talented Lenoir-Rhyne University students. The program accomplishes this by preparing Lineberger Fellows to become more competitive applicants for post-graduate fellowships, awards and exceptional employment opportunities. The program also fosters camaraderie by offering several social opportunities throughout the year. The Fellows meet regularly with the Director to establish personal and professional priorities, develop plans for success, explore networking opportunities, and practice formal and informal interviewing skills. The Fellows participate in career development workshops focusing on self-awareness, internships, the graduate school selection and application process, resumé design, and social media branding. In addition to the personal mentoring and professional guidance provided by the program, Lineberger Fellows receive financial support to purchase passports, attend conferences, receive individual tutoring in a foreign language and enhance their Lenoir-Rhyne University educational experience by receiving funds for national and international travel opportunities.

Participation in the Lineberger Fellows Program is by invitation only. Program expectations include: maintaining a competitive GPA (3.8+) and attending approximately eight mandatory meetings and several highly recommended meetings and events that are announced at the beginning of each academic year. In addition, Fellows will participate in a Fellows common read and in career development workshops and retreats that are announced at the beginning of each academic year.

The program is supported by the Lineberger Center for Cultural and Educational Renewal and is not affiliated with the Lenoir-Rhyne University Lineberger Scholarship awarded by the university.

Lutheran College Washington Semester

Lenoir-Rhyne University is a member of the Lutheran College Washington Consortium which conducts a work/study program in Washington, D.C. Under this program, students spend the semester in Washington and are required to complete two seminars (eight credits) and a 25-30 hour internship and public service component (eight credits). Students enroll at Lenoir-Rhyne and pay tuition at the rate charged by Lenoir-Rhyne University. The program emphasizes the ethical dimension of important questions of public affairs. A separate summer residential housing program is also available. Further information about this program may be obtained by calling 828-328-7216.

Multicultural Affairs

The Office of Multicultural Affairs at Lenoir-Rhyne University aspires to create a diverse community that welcomes people of different races, cultures, ages, genders, sexual orientations, religions, socioeconomic levels, political perspectives, abilities, opinions, values and experiences. Lenoir-Rhyne University will strive to reflect these differences in its decisions, curriculum, programs and actions. We will also strive to create an environment that brings out the best in all people that leads to positive contributions to the Lenoir-Rhyne community. The University will seek to ensure that underrepresented groups have equal access to the education and resource opportunities available at the University. Policy and procedures will create and sustain an inclusive and productive environment for faculty, staff and students.

Observatory

The observatory, located atop the Minges Science Building, houses a 12 1/2-inch reflecting telescope that can be operated in the Cassegrain or Newtonian mode. The observatory is equipped for UBV and UBVY photoelectric photometry and for astrophotography. Additional equipment includes two four-inch refractors, two eight- inch Meade Schmidt-Cassegrainian reflectors, and various special cameras, including a CCD camera. The possibility exists for the addition to the facilities of a 20-inch Ritchey-Chretien reflector. The observatory is utilized at all levels of college instruction. Future plans include the addition of a computer and telescope control for the CCD camera and photography.

The William and Robert Shuford Center for International Education

The mission of the Shuford Center for International Education is to stimulate, develop and support initiatives and programs, abroad and on-campus, that equip students with the cross-cultural skills and awareness of global issues they will need for gainful employment and service in the world. The SCIE promotes semester and year-long study abroad programs; short-term, faculty-led study abroad programs; and a rich set of affordable summer opportunities as well. The SCIE also provides immigration services for Lenoir-Rhyne’s international exchange students and provides for their acculturation and integration into life at Lenoir-Rhyne. The SCIE organizes a wide variety of on campus initiatives to promote intercultural learning and meaningful interaction between U.S. and international students including overseeing a living learning community called the Global Village.

Lenoir-Rhyne University, through the William and Robert Shuford Center for International Education, is a member of NAFSA: Association of International Education; the Institute for International Education (IIE); The Forum on Education Abroad; International Student Exchange Programs (ISEP); and the Consortium for North American Higher Education Collaboration (CONAHEC).

Study Abroad Programs

Lenoir-Rhyne University sponsors study abroad student exchange programs at more than 150 institutions in over 50 countries around the globe. Through Lenoir-Rhyne’s agreements with exchange partners, students are registered for classes at Lenoir-Rhyne and receive credit for the course work they complete while abroad. Students may use their Lenoir-Rhyne financial aid for any of these exchange programs. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 to be approved for study abroad.

Lenoir-Rhyne professors also lead short term study abroad programs during spring break or during May, June, or July. The costs of these study programs vary from program-to-program.

Contact the Assistant Director of the William and Robert Shuford Center for International Education at 828328-7375 for more information on study abroad programs.

International Student Services

The William and Robert Shuford Center for International Education (SCIE) provides immigration services to Jvisa holding international students. The SCIE staff will assist with information about:

  • Immigration regulations for J students and scholars
  • DS 2019s and J visas
  • Health insurance for J visa holders
  • Employment on campus for J visa holders
  • Academic matters for J visa holders
  • Cultural adjustment
  • Academic Training for J visa holders

Degree-seeking international students should contact Eric Brandon in the Division of Enrollment Management at 828-328-7301 for more information.

  • Immigration regulations for F visa holding students
  • I-20s for F visas
  • Health insurance for international athletes and all other F visa holders
  • Employment on and off campus for F visa holders
  • Academic matters
  • Optional Practical Training
  • Curricular Practical Training

Reese Institute for the Conservation of Natural Resources

The Thomas W. Reese Institute for the Conservation of Natural Resources was established through an endowment gift from Lenoir-Rhyne graduate Thomas W. Reese, a nationally recognized conservationist. It promotes leadership for service through a program that emphasizes regional environmental issues, economic development, and the conservation and use of natural resources. The goal of the Institute is to become a nationally recognized conservation program that works closely with regional government, industry, and community groups to clarify environmental problems and identify practical solutions. Students and community members will be able to participate in a variety of educational experiences, including field work and internships. For further information contact the Director of Reese Institute at 828-328-7606.